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Category Archives: Leveling

Shaman Leveling: 30-49 Enhancement

Leveling Enhancement 1-29

This post’s MS Paint was done on a laptop with just the trackpad, so they’re even “better” then usual. Enjoy!


Playing an Enhancement Shaman
There isn’t all that much that changes in this particular level range from the 1-29 range. You’re still primarily a melee DPS class that weaves spells in between your attacks. But, you do start to get a better feel for how the class is going to play at max level as you finally get access to some of your really key features such as dropping all four totems with a single cast, actually having access to all four totems in the first place, and the ability to resurrect yourself.

As Enhancement, you’ll still have a very hybrid combat style where you weave melee and spells into a deadly mixture of ferocity, and the higher you get in level the more apparent that becomes. You don’t quite hit the premium level of that mixture in this level range, but you’re getting closer.

Enhancement-Specific Tips
The biggest suggestion I have for this bracket is directed at those of you who have played Enhancement in the past and are now leveling new ones or trying to get back into the class/spec after a long time away from it – do not use dual Windfury Weapon buffs. I loved rocking dual WF back in the day and seeing those swirly black tornados of doom popping left and right, but you’re gimping your own DPS if you do it. Also, don’t think you can get away with using spell caster weapons or fast weapons either, that’s all been nerfed.

Windfury Main Hand – Flametongue Off Hand

Otherwise, it’s pretty much business as usual compared to the last guide. The main difference is that Windfury is going to drastically increase how fast you kill things. This is where you’ll really be able to appreciate the greatness that is instant-Ghost Wolf, and where you’ll start to develop a closer relationship with your totems as casting them all is much easier as is removing them all and restoring mana in the process.

Important Spells & Abilities
Note that all numeric values are taken from the level 49 version of the spell for the purposes of this post.

Level 30-39

  • Ancestral Recall (30): Yanks the caster through the twisting nether back to their Hearthstone Location. Speak to an Innkeeper in a different place to change your home location.
  • Call of the Elements (30): Simultaneously places up to 4 totems specified in the Totem Bar.
  • Reincarnation (30): Allows you to resurrect yourself upon death with 20% health and mana. [Reagent: Ankh]
  • Totemic Recall (30): Returns your totems to the earth, giving you 25% of the mana required to cast each totem destroyed by Totemic Recall.
  • Windfury Totem (30): Summons a Windfury Totem with 5 health at the feet of the caster. The totem increases the melee and ranged attack speed of all party and raid members within 40 yards by 10%. Lasts 5 min.
  • Windfury Weapon (32): Imbue the Shaman’s weapon with wind. Each hit has a 20% chance of triggering three extra attacks with 310 bonus attack power. Lasts 30 minutes.
  • Lava Burst (34): You hurl molten lava at the target, dealing 120 to 152 Fire damage. If your Flame Shock is on the target, Lava Burst will deal a critical strike.
  • Far Sight (36): Changes the caster’s viewpoint to the targeted location. Lasts 1 min. Only useable outdoors.
  • Magma Totem (36): Summons a Magma Totem with 5 health at the feet of the caster for (21 sec) sec that causes Fire damage to creatures within 8 yards every 2 seconds.
  • Grounding Totem (38): Summons a Grounding Totem with 5 health at the feet of the caster that will redirect one harmful spell cast on a nearby party member to itself, destroying the totem. Will not redirect area of effect spells. Lasts 45 sec.

Ancestral Recall was one of my favorite things about the Shaman when I first started playing; back when your hearthstone had a one hour cooldown. It’s still useful, but with the cooldown on your hearth lowered to 30 minutes, or 15 with the guild perk that most people have by now, it’s not quite as good as it used to be. But, it’s still a really useful spell if you’re doing a lot of travel (anyone doing Archeology out there?).

Call of the Elements and Totemic Recall are the both spells I would have killed for back in the day when I leveled my first shaman. Being able to drop all four totems (or fewer if you wish) with a single click/cast is a fantastic upgrade from the multiple GCD’s it would have taken you before. Totemic Recall destroys all of your existing totems and gives you a portion of their mana cost back when you do. The main benefit of this spell, as Enhancement, is to clear your totems from an area where they might draw some accidental agro.

Reincarnation is one of the signature abilities of the Shaman, allowing you to resurrect yourself when you die. If you’ve ever played a Warlock it works more or less the same as a Soul Stone, except that you can’t cast it on anyone else and you don’t have to cast it on yourself beforehand as you can cast it anytime you die as long as it’s not on cooldown.

Windfury Totem gives you melee haste, and it’s your best default Air totem with its duration and general benefit. In dungeons it’s going to be a great help when you have melee or hunters in your group. Magma Totem is your AoE totem of choice as it deals AoE damage itself as well as allowing you to cast your Fire Nova through it. If you have several mobs around you, go ahead and drop the Magma Totem, but remember that Searing Totem will give you more damage for single targets, especially as you get higher in level.

Windfury Weapon is THE reason why I love the Shaman class and the Enhancement spec. Windfury Weapon procs cause you to get three free, instant attacks on your target. I like to call the “swirly black tornado of DOOM” because that’s what it looks like, and that’s what it is. If you have a decent weapon for your level then Windfury procs generally mean that your target is dead, even if they were at full health.

Lava Burst isn’t really associated with being Enhancement, but I want to mention it anyway for its auto-crit property. You won’t often end up in situations where casting spells trumps melee, but for those rare instances where you end up rooted/snared or that your target is fleeing, this can be a really great option. You’ll be in the habit of having Flame Shock on all of your targets anyway, so this one’s basically a free ranged crit on demand. Since I’m mentioning PvP in my leveling posts now as well, this is especially worth mentioning even if it’s not something you’re casting in every battle.

Grounding Totem is another great spell that further increases the Shaman’s varied tool set. It’s often dismissed as a PvP totem, for which it is fantastic (and is getting buffed, though the cooldown is getting nerfed), but it does have some solid usefulness in PvE as well. You’ll find more spell casters in dungeons than in just questing, but any time you’re up against casters you might as well utilize your get-out-of-target-free card.

Another one of my favorite spells for the Shaman is Far Sight, which many players simply dismiss. For PvE, yeah, it’s about half a step above worthless. But, it’s still both fun and useful. It’s biggest benefit is PvP, where you can scout areas at range. In Arathi Basin I like to defend the Mine while casting Far Sight on the top of the Blacksmith which gives me a clear view of the entire map, including Lumber Mill. In Warsong Gulch you can spy on the enemy base from the safety of your own (you need to be on the “outside” section between the tunnel and the roof to do this from “inside” the bases).

I love casting Far Sight in PvE to hunt rare spawns. The great thing about Far Sight is that you cast it on any area that you can see on your screen, but you can recast it to any point that you can see from the place you’re already looking at with Far Sight, so you can chain cast this to look at the entire continent. You can also use it to hunt vanity pets from raptor nests such as the Ravasaur Hatchling, Leaping Hatchling, and Darting Hatchling.

Level 40-49
It’s important to note that at level 40 you also gain the ability (finally) to wear Mail armor, and you’ll want to upgrade your gear as soon as possible as not only do you get more armor from Mail, but you’re also about to enter the level range where you get a buff to your primary stat (Agility) only if you’re wearing your class’s particular armor type in all slots, which happens to be Mail for Shamans.

  • Call of the Ancestors (40): Simultaneously places up to 4 totems specified in the Totem Bar. Can call different totems than Call of the Elements.
  • Mana Spring Totem (42): Summons a Mana Spring Totem with 5 health at the feet of the caster for 5 min that restores 326 mana every 5 seconds to all party and raid members within 40 yards.
  • Wrath of Air Totem (44): Summons a Wrath of Air Totem with 5 health at the feet of the caster. The totem provides 5% spell haste to all party and raid members within 40 yards. Lasts 5 min.

Call of the Ancestors is the same thing as Call of the Elements at level 30, except that it allows you to set a different group of the totems so you can work with the tools you need in any situation without a lot of time spent juggling them around. You’ll end up with four of these all together and that’s basically what they’re for. I like having one set up for general questing and dungeons and another for PvP.

As I’ve said before, mana isn’t a big deal for Enhancement, but Mana Spring Totem is worth mentioning because your totems are great buffs for your party and mana is one of the major obstacles for people to deal with in dungeon settings. This is my default Water Totem for that very reason. Wrath of Air Totem I mention for the same reason I do Mana Spring; you aren’t a caster but you’ll definitely end up with at least one in any dungeon or battleground that you go to.

There are a few other spells you get in this range as well, and while they are useful they aren’t that great for Enhancement. Chain Heal is the biggest potential exception there, but it’s not as good at this level as it will be in another 20 levels when you can cast it instantly.

Leveling an Enhancement Shaman

Weapon Imbues: Windfury Weapon (main hand), Flametongue Weapon (off hand)
Totems:Strength of Earth Totem, Searing Totem (Magma for AoE), Mana Spring Totem, Windfury Totem

While Windfury Weapon is fantastic, it has an internal cooldown on it that will make your off hand weapon occasionally rob you of procs on your main hand which will result in decreased DPS. At level 62 I lost roughly 220 DPS using dual Windfury Weapon, and I didn’t even have all the talents that make Flametongue Weapon really shine for the off hand.

  • Questing Single Mob: Earth Shock, Stormstrike, Lava Lash, Earth Shock
  • Questing Multi-Mob: Call of the Elements, Flame Shock, Stormstrike, (swap targets), Lava Lash, Flame Shock
  • LFG Trash Rotation: Call of the Elements, Earth Shock, Stormstrike, Lava Lash, Earth Shock [Wind Shear]
  • LFG Boss Rotations: Call of the Elements, Flame Shock, Stormstrike, Lava Lash, Earth Shock [Wind Shear]

[EDIT: I had Primal Strike listed in the rotations instead of Stormstrike. Primal Strike is worthless once you have Stormstrike, so remove it from your bars and forget that it exists. The two share a cooldown, and Stormstrike out performs Primal Strike in every way.]

Questing Single Mob (no change from the 29 Guide)
In this rotation you’re just going to destroy targets as fast as possible. If you’re using heirloom weapons then I definitely suggest you stick to using Earth Shock as your go-to shock spell, but if you’re not using heirlooms then you might find Flame Shock to be a better option for the opening cast as it’s DoT damage will add up over time to be even more than Earth Shock. Any shocks you cast after the first one should be Earth Shocks though, unless you missed with the Flame Shock cast.

Questing Multi-Mob
Now that you can drop all four of your totems with a single cast I suggest you drop them as you rush into combat instead of planting them in advance as it just saves time. You can plant them ahead of time if you’d like, I just prefer doing it on the move. If the group of mobs you’re going to fight are close together, go ahead and pull them with a Chain Lightning, otherwise just stick to the rotation.

The point here is primarily to get Flame Shock cast on all of your targets so that they’re all taking damage, and then speeding up their deaths with your melee attacks. Light one up, bash them in the face a time or two, switch targets and repeat. Windfury procs will speed up your multi-mob combat speed a lot when it procs.

If you need to heal in these situations, go ahead and do so. If you find yourself running short on mana because you’re healing go ahead and switch over to Water Shield for the mana return and switch back to Lightning Shield when your health and mana are at a more manageable level.

LFG Trash
This one is the same as solo questing, except that sometimes you might want to bother with totems and others you might not. I don’t cast my totems by default at this level when I’m doing LFG, instead I wait to see how quickly we’re progressing through the instance. If we’re moving at a fast pace then I usually don’t bother with any of them until we see a boss. If we’re going kind of slow or we have people who are /afk or something, then I’ll go ahead and drop the totems to increase everyone’s performance.

For most trash pulls though, just stick to Earth Shocks and using your melee strikes as often as possible.

Wind Shear: Deserves a special mention here though. Shamans have crazy-good spell interruption capabilities thanks to Wind Shear. If you see a mob casting spells, particularly a healer, interrupt as many of their spells as possible. If you’re in instances with caster mobs who are especially annoying then be sure to make use of Wind Shear when they’re casting the spell you don’t want to go through.

During boss fights you can also use this to lower your Threat as you can cast it even if there’s not a spell to interrupt. With Windfury procs, each extra attack can generate a critical hit which can send your threat through the roof. With such a short cooldown and the fact that it can be cast regardless of the GCD, there’s really no reason for you not to use it.

LFG Boss
For bosses you want to maximize your DPS potential. That means that you’re going to make sure Flame Shock stays active on the boss as long as possible, and that you’re going to utilize your totems for the good of your group.

Totems: Strength of Earth, Flametongue (2+ casters, Searing otherwise), Mana Spring, Windfury (Wrath of Air for 2 casters)

Using Searing Totem will give you a higher, personal DPS score on a boss fight, but if you have at least one caster DPS in your group then you should probably lean towards Flametongue as both they and the healer will benefit from it as will you (though to a lesser extent). If there are no caster DPS in the group then switch your Fire totem over to Searing and drop it right next to the boss when you move into melee range. Mana Spring is the choice for Water as your mini heals from the other won’t help nearly as much. Windfury is your default Air, but if your other two DPS are both casters then go for Wrath of Air instead since Haste really isn’t your top priority anyway.

Once Flame Shock is dealing its damage you’ll start rotating through your melee attacks and casting Earth Shock as filler while you wait to refresh Flame Shock. If you time your shocks just right you can get two Earth Shocks off with almost perfect timing for your shocks to refresh just as Flame Shock ends, allowing you to reapply it immediately with no time lost.

Wind Shear will still work on many boss abilities at low levels, so be ready to use it when you get the chance as Shamans have a fairly flexible and laid back rotation at this point. Spells you want to interrupt in particular are healing spells and AoE damage spells such as Chain Lightning. I could go into specifics, but this is a class guide, not a boss guide, so just use your own judgment. Remember that Wind Shear also lowers your threat, which can be a big deal now that you have Windfury Weapon on your main hand and can generate some very high burst threat.

Talent Spec: 49 Enhancement Shaman

  • Static Shock 3/3: When you use your Primal Strike, Stormstrike, or Lava Lash abilities while having Lightning Shield active, you have a 45% chance to deal damage equal to a Lightning Shield orb without consuming a charge.
  • Elemental Devastation 1/3: When you deal critical damage with a non-periodic spell, your chance to get a critical strike with melee attacks increases by 3% for 10 sec.
  • Searing Flames 3/3: Causes the Searing Bolts from your Searing Totem to have a 100% chance to set their targets aflame, dealing damage equal to the Searing Bolt’s impact damage over 15 sec. Stacks up to 5 times.
  • Elemental Devastation +2 (3/3): When you deal critical damage with a non-periodic spell, your chance to get a critical strike with melee attacks increases by 9% for 10 sec.
  • Unleashed Rage 1/2:
    Increases your expertise by 4, and increases all party and raid members’ attack power by 5% while within 100 yards of the Shaman.

Honorable Mention: Frozen Power 2/2: Increases the damage done by your Lightning Bolt, Chain Lightning, Lava Lash, and Shock spells by 10% on targets afflicted by your Frostbrand Attack effect, and your Frost Shock has a 100% chance to root the target in ice for 5 sec. when used on targets at or further than 15 yards from you.

Static Shock is first on my list because I like to have more consistent DPS increases rather than relying on something like crit chance. While there’s only a 45% chance to proc the talent, that’s still much more consistent than a bit of crit chance. That being said, I do like Elemental Devastation for additional crit on my melee attacks when I crit with spells. With the Shaman’s hybrid melee/caster play style you’ll deal with a lot of opportunities to get this to proc. I suggest splitting the points you spend it though, because of this next talent.

Searing Flames is the reason why your Flame totem of choice is Searing Totem. It causes the totem to turn into a stacking DoT debuff. While level 49 opens you up to another key class/spec ability (Shamanistic Rage), I don’t feel that this one in particular needs to be rushed into as survivability is typically a non-issue while leveling and you don’t really have enough high-cost spells to need the mana benefits of it just yet. Instead I suggest you increase our DPS through Unleashed Rage as it not only gives you 5% more attack power (10% once you spend the other point in it), but it also reduces your chance to be avoided. Not only that, but it gives that benefit to your whole party/raid.

The Honorable Mention is a talent that I spent points in instead of topping off Elemental Devastation right away. It’s usually considered a PvP talent since it freezes people in place and gives extra buffs when using Frostbrand Weapon (the PvP imbue), but I really enjoy using it in PvE as well. I use it often when gathering to freeze mobs that would otherwise stop me from gathering, I use it to stop runners (though I could use a totem for that), and of course I do love using it in PvP as well. I like having types of control in my tool set for any class that I play, and this talent fits very well into my play style.

Glyphs

Prime Glyphs

With Lava Lash being a staple attack and the fact that you get it at level 10, this is my first choice of Prime Glyphs, increasing its damage by 20%. Next up is Stormstrike as the bonus crit can be useful with how many spells you cast in combat. Finally I have Flame Shock listed though it’s important to note that it’s really only useful in LFG boss fights or in PvP as typical mobs and dungeon trash will not live long enough for even the normal duration to matter.

Major Glyphs

Lightning Shield is overall going to be the most useful glyph for you here; it’s how you turn your Lightning Shield into a solid 10 minute buff instead of lasting only for three hits worth. Ghost Wolf is my next choice because moving faster is always a good thing, both in PvE and PvP. Frost Shock deserves a mention for those of you interested in getting into some low level PvP, though I would generally always suggest Ghost Wolf above this one for that purpose.

Fire Nova is probably the best investment if you’re looking to beef up your AoE ability in dungeons by increasing its radius and taking away the hassle of replanting your totems. Chain Lightning is one I haven’t used myself, but it deserves a mention for AoE if you enjoy it.

Minor Glyphs

I’m a huge fan of getting rid of reagents, so Water Walking is the definite first choice here. We have a few more options that do the same thing for spells that opened in this range, with Water Breathing and Renewed Life. Of the three, you’ll cast Water Walking more often (I do, at least), but Renewed Life is probably more valuable overall. The other cool option is Ancestral Recall, which cuts the cooldown in half. It’s not super useful in today’s short hearthstone world, but if you need to do a lot of back and forth travel (*cough*archeology*cough*) then it can be really useful. Arctic Wolf is a simple vanity glyph that just changes the way you look in Ghost Wolf form.

Gearing Up Your Shaman
As Enhancement your primary stat is Agility. Each point gives you 2 Attack Power and it also boosts your Melee Crit (and Dodge). Intellect boosts your Spell Power on a 1:1 ratio, and it also increases your Spell Crit and your mana. Strength is a decent stat for you as it still gives a 1:1 ratio for Attack Power, but it’s not something you really want to seek out unless you just cannot find any Agility pieces at all for those slots.

You also want to look for gear with Hit on it in particular since you take a penalty to melee hits for dual wielding. You don’t need a ton of Hit to get you by while you’re leveling, but if you find some good Agility pieces that also have Hit on them then be sure to pick them up.

For green gear with random enchants you’re probably most interested in “..of the Falcon” (Agility and Intellect), “..of the Tiger” (Agility and Strength), and “..of the Monkey” (Agility and Stamina).

As you get into running random dungeons you’re looking for items with the “..of Agility” and “..of the Bandit” (Agility, Stamina, and Crit) enchant on them from the Satchel of Helpful Goods.

There are two ways you can look at gearing up your low level Shaman. You can either go for maximum killing potential, which is stacking Agility above all else, or you can go with a more balanced build where you look for gear with both Agility and Stamina. I prefer maximizing my damage potential, personally, and going for good survival pieces in slots that I have no Agility piece to fill in. If you’re not used to healing on the fly as a DPS spec though, you might want to lean more towards survival.

Dungeon Gear
I got some good feedback from putting the dungeon drop list in the last post, so here’s one for this level range as well. Again, I’m not going to go into detail as far as which pieces to pair up from which dungeons to get a “best in slot” list, but I will give you a list of the items that if they dropped for me, I would consider rolling on if they were an upgrade to what I currently had.

A lot of the “good” lower level gear is tuned more towards Strength, which is still good though it’s not great. Agility is where it’s at, so don’t pass up an Agility piece for a Strength piece unless the value is at least twice that of the Agility piece.

Also remember that while Leather is still really good gear for you, you should try to upgrade all of your armor slots to Mail as soon as possible from level 40 on.

Scarlet Monastery: Graveyard
Bloody Brass Knuckles: Fist Weapon, +5 Agility, +5 Hit
Ebon Vise: Leather Gloves, +9 Agility, +6 Stamina, +6 Crit
Ironspine’s Eye: Ring, +9 Agility, +4 Crit
Ironspine’s Fist: 1H Mace, +3 Agility, +5 Stamina, +3 Hit
Ironspine’s Ribcage: Mail Chest, +8 Strength, +11 Stamina, +8 Crit
Gloves of the Pure: Leather Gloves, +5 Agility, +8 Stamina, +5 Hit

The Ebon Vise gloves drop from a rare spawn. Ironspine’s Eye also comes from a rare spawn, as does his Fist and Ribcage. Ironspine’s Fist isn’t the best weapon for us, as it’s a little bit fast, but at least it has both Agility and Hit. The Gloves of the Pure are a quest reward.

Scarlet Monastery: Library
Dog Training Gloves: Leather Gloves, +9 Agility, +6 Stamina, +6 Hit
Houndmaster’s Belt: Leather Belt, +6 Agility, +9 Stamina, +6 Crit

The Houndmaster’s Belt is a quest reward.

Scarlet Monastery: Armory
Herod’s Shoulder: Mail Shoulder, +11 Strength, +7 Stamina, +7 Crit
Raging Berserker’s Helmet: Mail Helm, +16 Strength, +5 Agility, +8 Crit
Herod’s Medallion: Neck, +5 Strength, +7 Stamina, +5 Hit
Cloak of the False Champion: Cloak, +5 Agility, +7 Stamina, +5 Crit

Herod’s Medallion, and the items listed below it, are all quest rewards, and they’re all from the same quest as well. Pick whichever item is the best upgrade for your current gear.

Scarlet Monastery: Cathedral
Branded Leather Bracers: Leather Bracer, +10 Agility, +6 Stamina
Gauntlets of Divinity: Mail Gloves, +13 Agility, +7 Stamina, +4 Hit
Hand of Righteousness: 1H Mace, +7 Intellect, +7 Spirit
Scarlet Leggings: Mail Legs, +20 Strength, +10 Stamina
Grasps of the Insane: Mail Gloves, +7 Strength, +11 Stamina, +7 Haste
Band of Grandiose Illusions: Ring, +5 Agility, +8 Stamina, +5 Crit

I mention the Hand of Righteousness only because if you don’t have access to heirlooms then despite the fact that the bonus stats on it kind of suck for your spec, the damage and speed on it aren’t too bad. While it’s definitely more of a caster weapon, if nobody needs it and it’s an upgrade for you, go ahead and take it.

The Grasps of the Insane and Band of Grandiose Illusions are both quest rewards from the same quest.

Razorfen Kraul
Ferine Leggings: Leather Legs, +15 Agility, +10 Stamina
Whisperwind Headdress: +8 Stamina, +15 Intellect, +5 Crit
Tusken Helmet: Mail Helm, +11 Agility, +11 Stamina, +11 Crit
Pronged Reaver: 1H Axe, +6 Agility, +4 Hit
Agamaggan’s Clutch: Ring, +6 Stamina, +6 Intellect, +6 Spirit
Monkey Ring: Ring, +8 Agility, +6 Crit
Agamaggan’s Silent Tear: Ring, +5 Agility, +8 Stamina, +5 Hit
Boots of the Noble Path: Mail Boots, +7 Strength, +11 Stamina, +7 Crit

The Ferine Leggings may be leather, but they have great stats on them. The Tusken Helm and Pronged Reaver are particularly great drops, assuming you don’t have heirlooms to fill those slots instead.

The Monkey Ring, and the items below it, are all quest rewards. The Ring is from one quest, the rest from another. Again, some are listed just as upgrades to slots that you might be struggling with, not necessarily because they’re “great” items.

Maraudon
Grovekeeper’s Drape: Cloak, +8 Agility, +5 Stamina, +5 Crit
Claw of Celebras: Off Hand Fist Weapon, Chance on hit: Poisons target for 9 Nature damage every 2 sec for 20 sec.
Albino Crocscale Boots: Leather Boots, +12 Agility, +6 Stamina, +4 Hit
Fungus Shroud Armor: Leather Chest, +17 Agility, +11 Stamina
Phytoskin Spaulders: Leather Shoulders, +12 Agility, +6 Stamina, +4 Hit
Bloomsprout Headpiece: Mail Helm, +15 Strength, +15 Stamina
Bracers of the Stone Princess: Mail Bracers, +8 Agility, +5 Stamina, +5 Hit
Elemental Rockridge Leggings: Mail Legs, +15 Strength, +10 Stamina, +10 Crit
Infernal Trickster Leggings: Mail Legs, +13 Agility, +9 Stamina, +9 Hit
Rockgrip Gauntlets: Mail Gloves, +11 Agility, +7 Stamina, +7 Crit
Fist of Stone: 1H Mace, Chance on hit: Restores 50 mana.
Blackstone Ring: Ring, +6 Strength, +6 Stamina, +6 Hit
Leggings of the Verdant Oasis: Leather Legs, +10 Agility, +15 Stamina, +10 Hit

The Leggings of the Verdant Oasis are a quest reward.

Uldaman
Oilskin Leggings: Leather Legs, +15 Agility, +15 Stamina
Revelosh’s Spaulders: Leather Shoulders, +10 Stamina, +Random Enchant
Rockshard Paulders: Leather Shoulders, +11 Agility, +8 Stamina, +8 Hit
Worn Running Boots: Leather Boots, +13 Agility, +9 Stamina
Cragfists: Mail Gloves, +8 Crit, +Random Enchant
Horned Viking Helmet: Mail Helm, +17 Strength, +17 Stamina, Use: Charge an enemy, knocking it silly for 30 seconds. Also knocks you down, stunning you for a short period of time. Any damage caused will revive the target. Chance to fizzle when used against targets over level 60. (30 Min Cooldown)
Ironaya’s Bracers: Mail Bracers, +Random Enchant
Revelosh’s Armguards: Mail Bracers, +8 Stamina, +Random Enchant
Revelosh’s Boots: Mail Boots, +10 Stamina, +Random Enchant
Galgann’s Firehammer: 1H Mace, +7 Stamina, Chance on hit: Blasts a target for 80 to 112 Fire damage.
Archaedic Stone: Ring, +50 Armor, +Random Enchant
Durdin’s Hammer: 1H Mace, +4 Agility, +7 Stamina, +4 Hit
Band of Uldaman: Ring, +9 Stamina, +6 Intellect, +6 Spirit

Uldaman is kind of cool in that a lot of the boss drops have random enchants. At the same time, it sucks for that very same reason. You’re looking for enchants with Agility or Attack Power, Intellect isn’t too bad, nor is Strength. Galgann’s Firehammer is a great weapon if you don’t have heirlooms; it’s just a big faster than optimum, but the damage proc can add up fast with Windfury Weapon procs as all four attacks can proc the extra damage.

The following items are Horde-only because the “bosses” they drop from are friendly to Alliance toons: Worn Running Boots, Horned Viking Helmet. I would love to get my hands on that helmet, and I might farm it with my Tauren just so I can have it. This item used to be Plate, but was switched to Mail in Cataclysm.

The last 2 items there are quest rewards.

Scholomance
Has an insane amount of gear in it. Since we’re getting into level 40 content, I’m only going to list Mail Armor from now on, even though there may be some really nice upgrades for you that are Leather. I’m also going to stop listing items that do not give a bonus to Agility, except for weapons, and special slots such as trinkets and relics.

If you want a full list of the items that drop, you can follow this link and search through them yourself.
Bloodmail Armor Set: Mail Belt, Boots, Gloves, Chest, Legs: +58 Agility, +58 Stamina, +34 Crit, +24 Hit
Bone Golem Shoulders: Mail Shoulders, +14 Agility, +10 Stamina
Shadowy Mail Greaves: Mail Boots, +10 Agility, +10 Stamina, +10 Haste
Windreaver Greaves: Mail Boots, +14 Agility, +10 Hit
Iceblade Hacker: 1H Axe, +7 Agility, +7 Crit
Bonechill Hammer: 1H Mace, Chance on hit: Blasts a target for 90 Frost damage.
Hammer of the Vesper: 1H Mace, +7 Strength, +7 Stamina
Libram of Divinity: Relic, +4 Stamina, +4 Intellect, +4 Spirit, 1 Prismatic Gem Slot
Totem of Sustaining: Relic, +4 Stamina, +4 Intellect, +4 Spirit, 1 Prismatic Gem Slot
Discipline Rod: 1H Mace, +5 Strength, +7 Stamina, +5 Hit
Shackles of Punishment: Mail Bracers, +6 Agility, +9 Stamina, +6 Crit

Of particular note are the Libram of Divinity and Totem of Sustaining as they are both Relics which you’ve likely not had access to up to this point, nor will you likely have access to another for quite some time. They also have a gem slot which can give you even more stats, though depending on which gem you put in you may not be able to benefit from the extra stats for quite a while.

You can use up to a Delicate Cardinal Ruby in this relic for +20 Agility, or if you can’t find/make/afford one then you can go with a Delicate Scarlet Ruby for +16 Agility instead. There are also lesser versions that will cost less gold on the AH (and give you less Agility), but those are the top two you’re looking for and they should be easy to find since people are still using them in some of their Cataclysm gear.

You may also consider using one of these Hit Gems since dual wielding requires more Hit, or you may even want to consider one of these Intellect Gems to increase the damage and crit rate of your spells as well as the size of your mana pool. Being able to use up to Wrath level gems in a level 40 item is pretty fantastic.

The last two items are quest rewards.

Razorfen Downs
Boar Champion’s Belt: Mail Belt, +13 Agility, +8 Stamina, +8 Crit
Koriastrasza’s Amulet: Neck, +7 Agility, +10 Stamina, +7 Hit

The Amulet is a quest reward.

Dire Maul
Dire Maul has even more loot in it than Scholomance does, and that’s saying something. Again, I’m going to leave out all non-Mail gear and all non-Agility gear save for Weapons and other exceptional non-armor pieces.
Evil Eye Pendant: Neck, +11 Agility, +5 Hit, +4 Crit
Fluctuating Cloak: Cloak, +7 Agility, +7 Stamina, +7 Haste, +4 HP/5 seconds
Jagged Bone Fist: 1H Fist Weapon, +6 Agility, +6 Stamina, +6 Crit
Demon Howl Wristguards: Mail Bracers, +7 Agility, +7 Stamina, +7 Crit
Gauntlets of Accuracy: Mail Gloves, +14 Agility, +10 Hit
Leggings of Destruction: Mail Legs, +15 Agility, +15 Stamina, +15 Crit
Odious Greaves: Mail Boots, +10 Agility, +10 Stamina, +10 Haste
Ogre Forged Hauberk: Mail Chest, +21 Agility, +9 Stamina, +9 Crit
Warpwood Binding: Mail Belt, +10 Agility, +10 Stamina, +10 Crit
Well Balanced Axe: 1H Axe, +7 Agility, +7 Stamina
Hammer of Revitalization Main Hand Mace, +5 Stamina, +12 Intellect
Ring of Demonic Potency: Ring, +7 Agility, +7 Stamina, +7 Crit
Tarnished Elven Ring: Ring, +12 Agility, +8 Hit
Counterattack Lodestone: Trinket, +14 Strength, +14 parry
Dire Maul: 1H Mace, +5 Agility, +7 Stamina, +5 Haste

The Hammer of Revitalization gets a special mention because of its damage. It doesn’t give us the best stats, but that 12 Intellect is still pretty good and the damage is higher than the other weapons listed here.

The Counterattack Lodestone should go to a tank, of course, but if they don’t want it then you might as well take it as you’re not likely to have anything especially better.

The Dire Maul is a quest reward.

Zul’Farrak
Ripsaw: 1H Axe, Chance on hit: Wounds the target for 75 damage.
The Hand of Antu’sul: 1H Mace, Chance on hit: Blasts nearby enemies with thunder increasing the time between their attacks by 11% for 10 sec and doing 7 Nature damage to them. Will affect up to 4 targets.

The Hand of Antu’sul is a great weapon. It doesn’t have any stats on it, but it has solid damage and the proc on it has no cooldown, meaning when you dual wield them you can have several back-to-back procs off of all of your attacks and all of your Windfury-procced attacks as well, turning you into quite the low level AoE melee machine.

Stratholme
Here’s another instance with a huge loot table, so again I’m skipping non-Mail, non-Agility Armors, but including any good weapons or otherwise exceptional pieces of gear.
Cape of the Black Barron: Cloak, +9 Agility, +9 Stamina, +9 Haste
Stoneskin Gargoyle Cape: Cloak, +9 Agility, +9 Stamina, +9 Haste
Gargoyle Shredder Talons: Off Hand Fist Weapon, Chance on hit: Wounds the target causing them to bleed for 110 damage over 30 sec.
Willey’s Back Scratcher: Main Hand Fist Weapon, +6 Agility, +6 Stamina, +6 Crit
Beaststalker’s Boots: Mail Boots, +14 Agility, +23 Stamina
Crown of Tyranny: Mail Helm, +14 Agility, +14 Stamina, +14 Crit
Gauntlets of Deftness: Mail Gloves, +17 Agility, +8 Stamina, +8 Hit
Timmy’s Galoshes: Mail Boots, +11 Agility, +11 Stamina, +11 Haste
Darkspinner Claws: Mail Gloves, +9 Agility, +9 Stamina, +13 Nature Resist, +13 Shadow Resist, +9 Crit
Bone Slicing Hatchet: 1H Axe, +9 Agility, +6 Stamina, +6 Crit
Soul Breaker: 1H Axe, Chance on hit: Target enemy loses 12 health and mana every 3 sec for 30 sec.
The Cruel Hand of Timmy: 1H Mace, Chance on hit: Lowers all attributes of target by 15 for 1 min.
Idol of Brutality: Relic, +5 Agility, +5 Stamina, +5 Dodge
Ramstein’s Lightning Bolts: Trinket, +8 Hit, Use: Harness the power of lightning to strike down all enemies around you for 200 Nature damage. (5 Min Cooldown)
Balnazzar’s Hide: Cloak, +7 Agility, +10 Stamina, +7 Hit
Idol of the Paragon: Relic, +5 Agility, +5 Stamina, +5 Hit , +1 Prismatic Gem Socket
Book of the Paragon: Relic, +5 Stamina, +5 Intellect, +5 Haste, +1 Prismatic Gem Socket
Relic of the Paragon: Relic, +5 Stamina, +5 Dodge, +5 Hit, +1 Prismatic Gem Socket
Statue of the Paragon: Relic, +5 Strength, +5 Stamina, +5 Crit, +1 Prismatic Gem Socket

Balnazzar’s Hide is a quest reward, as are the four relics at the end of that list. With a sure way to get your hands on an early relic, I highly suggest you run Strath once you reach the level required to get one (Idol is the one you want, btw). Slap a Wrath level gem in that sucker for +20 Agility, +20 Hit, +20 Intellect or anything else you please.

I mention the Lightning Bolts trinket primarily because it’s additional Hit, but also because it has an AoE Lightning effect which just screams Shaman while also being interesting.

PvP Rewards
Sentinel’s Medallion: Neck, +12 Agility, +8 Stamina (45 Honor)
Highlander’s Chain Greaves: Mail Boots, +8 Agility, +17 Stamina, +8 Crit, +8% Run Speed (70 Honor)
Highlander’s Chain Girdle: Mail Belt, +10 Agility, +8 Stamina, +14 Crit (70 Honor)
Protector’s Band: Ring, +10 Strength, +9 Agility, +6 Stamina (45 Honor)

These are all the Alliance versions of the items, but there are links to the Horde version on each page.

 

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Shaman Leveling: 1-29 Enhancement

The first class I ever really tried to get into on my own was the Shaman. My first toon was a Hunter that I got to level 20, but I had no idea what I was doing and just shot things in the face until they either died or closed into melee range with me. But the Shaman was the first class that I ever did any research on to try to learn how to play it and play it well. In looking at the class my first impressions were to be Elemental or Resto because casting just seemed so much more powerful than melee back in the day, but then I eventually found out the insane burst damage of Windfury and I was sold.

I’ve leveled up a few Enhancement Shamans in my time, though none of them ever reached max level. My highest level Shaman to date was level 54, an Orc Enhancement Shaman named Belgawrath. But during Wrath my wife’s main was an Enhancement Shaman so I’m continually reading guides and blog posts about the class and spec so that I can pass on all of the important information to her.

But now the time comes once again for me to level my own, but this time I’m going all the way to 85.


Playing an Enhancement Shaman
Enhancement Shamans are a great example of a hybrid class that has a truly hybrid playstyle as well. You’re a dual wielding melee class that deals a large portion of your damage as magic damage rather than just melee. Being tied so closely to the elements also means that you have a lot of flavor in the magic that you use as well, and though it’s all elemental, it’s not all tied to a specific element.

Of the dual wielding classes you’re more closely related to the Death Knight, in my opinion, than any other. Rather than weaving diseases into your melee, you’re instead weaving bursts of elemental damage, and rather than summoning the dead for aid you call on the spirit of wolves. You’re not a sneaky Rogue, or a pansy Hunter afraid of getting hit. You might be similar to a Fury Warrior, but I’ve honestly never played one of those beyond level 14 so I can’t say from experience.

Of all the characters I’ve ever played, the Shaman gives me the strongest feeling of actually “being there” in combat. All Shamans are able to take on the form of a Ghost Wolf, but only Enhancement (early on at least) can do so instantly, and I absolutely love turning into a wolf, charging towards an opponent and unleashing my fury on them, then instantly dropping back into wolf form to charge down the next target. It might not do much for you, but I’m a huge fan.

Shamans also come with a very special class mechanic that is all their own: Totems. Totems work similar to the party/raid-wide buffs of other classes, but rather than being cast on players they are instead centered around a totem that is placed on the ground. When the totems are active, they grant their buff to a wide area. Most totems work in that fashion, providing buffs of one kind or another, but there are others that deal/heal damage or summon elemental pets for their duration as well. We’ll get into the specifics a little bit later for those you’ll actually use as Enhancement, but it deserved a mention here.

Shamans also have another special class mechanic which is their Shields. Shamans have three different Shield spells, with Lightning Shield and Water Shield available to all specs, and Earth Shield available only to Restoration Shamans. Each of these shields is built around a “charges” mechanic that has a specific effect whenever a charge is triggered to be used. Lightning Shield deals damage, Water Shield restores mana, and Earth Shield heals the target when they get hit. More on those later as well.

Enhancement-Specific Tips
As Enhancement you don’t use a whole lot of your mana during combat, and what you do use you’ll typically regenerate through your class abilities anyway. You still cast spells very frequently, but you typically don’t have to worry too much about mana. As a melee class though, you are a bit more “squishy” than many other melee classes because you only wear Leather armor until level 40 where you upgrade to Mail. But remember that Shamans are also healers, and because you’re not spending much of your mana it’s usually not a problem for you to stop the offense for the sake of casting a healing spell on yourself.

As a DPS spec you’ll typically want to use Lightning Shield to deal additional damage whenever an enemy hits you with an attack. At later levels you may occasionally switch to Water Shield instead to be sure you have adequate mana. In this level range, Lightning Shield is a passive DPS spell, dealing damage only when you’re attacked, but at higher levels you’ll also be able to trigger the charges of Lightning Shield with your attacks.

Remember that Shamans are a partially hybrid class with a very hybrid playstyle. You’re meant to be able to heal while you’re in your DPS spec, so do so. You’re not supposed to be “the healer”, but you are designed to be able to toss those heals out there when they’re needed. Shamans can be very “squishy”, taking a lot of damage in a short time, but we also pack some very efficient healing to get us through those times. At these low levels your healing spells will nearly restore you to full in a single cast. You can take that one of two ways: either you can heal in the middle of combat to be sure to make it to the end, or you can push yourself and your damage potential to be able to destroy your enemies quickly and efficiently, and then heal yourself back up to full at the end of combat.

Important Spells & Abilities
Note that all numeric values are taken from the level 29 version of the spell for the purposes of this post.

Level 1-10

  • Lightning Bolt (1): Casts a bolt of lightning at the target for 39 to 43 Nature damage.
  • Primal Strike (3): An instant weapon strike that causes 10 additional damage.
  • Strength of Earth Totem (4): This totem increases the Strength and Agility of all party and raid members within 40 yards.
  • Earth Shock (5): Instantly shocks the target with concussive force, causing 49 to 51 Nature damage and reducing melee and ranged attack speed by 20% for 8 seconds.
  • Lightning Shield (8): The caster is surrounded by 3 balls of lightning. When a spell, melee or ranged attack hits the caster, the attacker will be struck for Nature damage. This expends one lightning ball. Only one ball will fire every few seconds. Lasts 10 minutes. Only one Elemental Shield can be active on the Shaman at any one time.
  • Flametongue Weapon (10): Imbue the Shaman’s Weapon with fire, increasing total spell damage by 408(?).
  • Searing Totem (10): This totem repeatedly attacks an enemy within 20 yards for fire damage. The totem will prefer to target enemies that are afflicted by your Flame Shock or Stormstrike effects. Lasts for 1 minute.

Lightning Bolt is the ability you start off with, and what you’ll be spamming for a few levels in order to kill things quickly. As you get higher in level you’ll cast this less and less until you final get a talent that allows you to cast it instantly, but that won’t happen in this level range. Primal Strike is going to be one of your best friends in this level bracket as one of the few melee attacks you have access to. If you’re in melee range then you want to use Primal Strike whenever it’s not on cooldown.

Strength of Earth Totem is your primary Earth totem now and forever. It provides both Strength and Agility to your group, both of which contribute to your primary damage stat Attack Power. I couldn’t find the exact amount that it grants you at level 29 and neither of my shamans right now is the right level to test it to see. Earth Shock is one of your bread and butter attacks, it’s an instant burst of damage which also provides a nice attack speed reduction to the target for a bit of additional survivability.

At level eight you receive Lightning Shield which is one of your primary buffs as it passively deals damage to anyone attacking you. Keeping this buff active is a bit of a pain until level 25 at which time you can add a glyph that prevents the orbs from being expended and instead turns it into a flat 10 minute buff. Flametongue Weapon is one of our most important weapon imbues at at level 10 you’ll have it on both of your weapons. Wowhead tells me that 408 Spell Power is the value at level 29, but that sounds way too high to me so I think the numbers are wrong.

Last up on the 1-10 list is Searing Totem which is your primary Fire totem for the rest of the game. It deals decent damage for now that will increase a lot more as you get higher in level and spend talent points to enhance its effect.

By choosing Enhancement as your specialization at level 10 you receive all of the following:
Lava Lash: You charge your off-hand weapon with lava, instantly dealing 200% of that weapon’s damage to an enemy target. Damage is increased by 40% if your off-hand weapon is enchanted with Flametongue.
Mental Quickness: Increases your spell power by an amount equal to 50% of your attack power, and reduces the mana cost of your instant beneficial, damaging, and totem spells by 75%.
Dual Wield: Allows one-hand and off-hand weapons to be equipped in your off-hand, allows you to parry frontal melee attacks, and increases your chance to hit by an additional 6%.
Primal Wisdom: Your melee attacks have a 40% chance to immediately restore 5% of your base mana.
Master: Enhanced Elements: Increases all Fire, Frost, and Nature damage done by 20%. Each point of Mastery increases damage by an additional 2.5%.

Lava Lash is one of our signature attacks, one that you’ll use very frequently and will be a big contribution to your overall damage. Mental Quickness is how our spell damage remains viable as a melee class that weaves spell damage into most of what we do, and it reduces spell costs by a 75% which is how we manage to cast spells as a class that doesn’t stack Intellect.

Dual Wield is another signature of our spec, allowing us to wield two weapons at once, and it’s one of the reasons I love playing this class as much as I do. Primal Wisdom relates to Mental Quickness up above, providing us with the means to regenerate our mana through melee combat so that we can continue casting spells even with a relatively small mana pool.

Enhanced Master doesn’t actually turn on until level 80, but it’s a big boost to damage once you do get access to it.

Level 11-20

  • Flametongue Totem (12): This totem increases the spell power of all party and raid members within 40 yards by 6%. Lasts 5 minutes.
  • Flame Shock (14): Instantly sears the target with fire, causing 28 Fire damage immediately and 48 Fire damage over 18 seconds.
  • Purge (12): Purges the enemy target, removing 1 beneficial Magic effect.
  • Ghost Wolf (16): Turns the Shaman into a Ghost Wolf, increaes speed by 30%. As a Ghost Wolf, the Shaman is less hindered by effects that would reduce movement speed.
  • Wind Shear (16): Disrupts the target’s concentration with a burst of wind, interrupting spellcasting and preventing any spell in that school form being cast for 2 seconds. Also lowers your threat, making the enemy less likely to attack you.
  • Cleanse Spirit (18): Removes one Curse effect from a friendly target.
  • Earthbind Totem (18): This totem slows the movement speed of enemies within 10 yards of the totem. Lasts for 45 seconds.
  • Water Shield (20): The caster is surrounded by 3 globes of water, graning 15 mana per 5 seconds. When a spell, melee or ranged attack hits the caster, mana is restored to the caster. This expends one water globe. Only one globe will activate every few seconds. Lasts 10 minutes. Only one Elemental Shield can be active on the Shaman at any one time.

Flametongue Totem is great for spell casters, but not a huge benefit to us as Enhancement. When I’m grouped with two or more casters I usually use this one instead of Searing Totem to benefit the group more. Flame Shock is our other bread and butter shock that we’ll use all the time. Flame Shock is best used on targets with large health pools, such as dungeon bosses, so that it will be active for the 18 seconds it takes for its full damage to take its place.

I decided to list Purge here as an offensive dispel, which I don’t often do. For the most part you’ll cast this in PvP to remove buffs from enemy targets, but there are some buffs you’ll want to remove in PvE as well. Since PvP is definitely a viable option for leveling your characters now, you’re going to see me mentioning things like this more than I used to. Ghost Wolf is a wonderful movement speed buff, allowing us to take on the form of a wolf to move faster. That second sentence in the description above means that you cannot go below 100% movement speed while in Ghost Wolf form. So you move at 130% normally with the buff, and you cannot be slowed below the 100%. Note that that applies to effects, not conditions, so you’ll still be slowed by things such as being in water.

Wind Shear is primarily used for its spell interrupting feature, though it does also reduce your threat in a group setting. I primarily use this on crowd control spells being cast on my party (like the Sleep spell cast by the Druids in Wailing Caverns) or to counter healing spells. In PvP you can use it on Player Pets that you haven’t generated threat against to cause them to stop attacking you. An experienced PvP player will quickly put them back on you, but you’d be surprised how many players don’t notice. Cleanse Spirit can remove Curse debuffs cast on you or your party, which is actually pretty common. Even though you’re playing a DPS spec it’s good practice to be in the habit of dispelling Curses as you can save your healers time and mana.

Earthbind Totem is somewhat situational. It’s a great totem for PvP, especially to slow Flag Carriers or pursuers of your Flag Carrier, or for allowing you to escape a deadly situation. In PvE it can slow mobs who run away when they’re low on health or it can be used to get some distance between you and your attackers to get a heal cast if you’re in danger of dying. Water Shield is the alternative to Lightning Shield, but not typically used by Enhancement. If you do find yourself in need of mana then you can certainly switch to Water Shield to get it back faster. I often switch to this shield in LFG in my upper-20’s as I start using more of our mana-intensive spells for AoE damage, but for soloing and questing I stick to Lightning Shield.

Level 21-29

  • Frost Shock (22): Instantly shocks the target with frost, causing 46 to 48 Frost damage and slowing movement speed by 50%. Lasts 8 seconds. Causes a high amount of threat.
  • Water Walking (24): Allows the friendly target to walk across water for 10 minutes. Any damage will cancel the effect.
  • Frostbrand Weapon (26): Imbue the Shaman’s weapon with frost. Each hit has a chance of causing additional Frost damage and slowing the target’s movement speed by 50% for 8 seconds. Lasts 30 minutes.
  • Chain Lightning (28): Hurls a lightning bolt at the enemy, dealing 55 to 61 Nature damage and then jumping to additional nearby enemies. Each jump reduces the damage by 30%. Affects 3 total targets.
  • Fire Nova (28): Causes the shaman’s active Flametongue, Magma, or Fire Elemental Totem to emit a wave of flames, inflicting Fire damage to enemies within 10 yards of the totem.

Frost Shock is another spell that I mention primarily for its usefulness in PvP. Slowing targets is a pretty big deal in a lot of PvP matches and talent points can be spent to make it freeze your target in place instead of just slowing them as well. In PvE it’s really only useful if you need to stop runners; Earth and Flame Shocks are more useful in PvE.

Water Walking is a cool utility spell that allows you to move on water. It’s great for certain PvP Battlegrounds and has some small usefulness in certain dungeons as well. For PvE can save you a little travel time prior to having a flying mount by letting you cut across water without being slowed down. Frostbrand Weapon is one you’ll only use in PvP as all of the other imbues offer better damage, but in PvP this can be a really good enchant to roll with.

Chain Lightning is our first AoE spell, and an interesting one in that it’s more multi-target than AoE. You’ll only really use this one in LFG or perhaps in PvP, unless you’re a AoE crazed leveler like myself in which case you’ll use it all the time. If you do use this one often then you’ll want to be sure to use Water Shield to keep your mana supply high. Fire Nova is our first literal AoE spell, dealing damage in a ring around our Fire totems. Searing Totem is our primary Fire totem when soloing, but it doesn’t allow Fire Nova to be cast through it, so you’ll need to remember to plant the right totems to use it, and the nova is centered on the totem itself, so you’ll need to drop your totem near your targets for it to be useful.

Leveling an Enhancement Shaman

  • Questing Single Mob: Earth Shock, Primal Strike/Stormstrike, Lava Lash, Earth Shock
  • Questing Multi-Mob: (Totems), Flame Shock, Primal Strike/Stormstrike, (swap targets), Lava Lash, Flame Shock
  • LFG Trash Rotation: (Totems), Earth Shock, Primal Strike/Stormstrike, Lava Lash, Earth Shock [Wind Shear]
  • LFG Boss Rotations: (Totems), Flame Shock, Primal Strike/Stormstrike, Lava Lash, Earth Shock [Wind Shear]

[NOTE: At level 29 you should replace Primal Strike with Stormstrike. Remove PS from your bars completely and forget that it exists. The two share a cooldown and are designed such that Stormstrike takes its place for Enhancement. Stormstrike is a better ability in every possible way and should be used from level 29 on.]

Questing Single Mob
In this rotation you’re just going to destroy targets as fast as possible. If you’re using heirloom weapons then I definitely suggest you stick to using Earth Shock as your go-to shock spell, but if you’re not using heirlooms then you might find Flame Shock to be a better option for the opening cast as it’s DoT damage will add up over time to be even more than Earth Shock. Any shocks you cast after the first one should be Earth Shocks though, unless you missed with the Flame Shock cast.

Questing Multi-Mob
If you know that your’e going to face multiple mobs, or multiple groups of mobs, go ahead and cast your totems before you get started on the actual combat. Just remember not to drop aggressive totems (like Searing) until you’re within range for it to hit your target(s) and you’re ready for combat to start.

I don’t suggest you intentionally get into combat with multiple targets as Enhancement unless you’re using heirlooms or are over-geared for the mobs you’re facing. Shamans have some good healing spells and a lot of utility, but they’re also pretty easily killed in this level range if you’re taking sustained damage.

If you do have good gear and decent survivability though, I suggest you go with this rotation. The point here is primarily to get Flame Shock cast on all of your targets so that they’re all taking damage, and then speeding up their deaths with your melee attacks. Light one up, bash them in the face a time or two, switch targets and repeat.

If you need to heal in these situations, go ahead and do so. If you find yourself running short on mana because you’re healing go ahead and switch over to Water Shield for the mana return and switch back to Lightning Shield when your health and mana are at a more manageable level.

LFG Trash
This one is the same as solo questing, except that sometimes you might want to bother with totems and others you might not. I don’t cast my totems by default at this level when I’m doing LFG, instead I wait to see how quickly we’re progressing through the instance. If we’re moving at a fast pace then I usually don’t bother with any of them until we see a boss. If we’re going kind of slow or we have people who are /afk or something, then I’ll go ahead and drop the totems to increase everyone’s performance.

For most trash pulls though, just stick to Earth Shocks and using your melee strikes as often as possible.

Wind Shear: Deserves a special mention here though. Shamans have crazy-good spell interruption capabilities thanks to Wind Shear. If you see a mob casting spells, particularly a healer, interrupt as many of their spells as possible. If you’re in instances with caster mobs who are especially annoying (LOOKING AT YOU, WAILING CAVERNS DRUIDS!!!) then be sure to make use of Wind Shear when they’re casting the spell you don’t want to go through.

LFG Boss
For bosses you want to maximize your DPS potential. That means that you’re going to make sure Flame Shock stays active on the boss as long as possible, and that you’re going to utilize your totems for the good of your group.

Totems: Strength of Earth, Flametongue, Healing Stream

Using Searing Totem will give you a higher, personal DPS score on a boss fight, but if you have at least one caster DPS in your group then you should probably lean towards Flametongue as both they and the healer will benefit from it as will you, though to a lesser extent. If there are no caster DPS in the group then switch your Fire totem over to Searing and drop it right next to the boss when you move into melee range.

Once Flame Shock is dealing its damage you’ll start rotating through your melee attacks and casting Earth Shock as filler while you wait to refresh Flame Shock. If you time your shocks just right you can get two Earth Shocks off with almost perfect timing for your shocks to refresh just as Flame Shock ends, allowing you to reapply it immediately with no time lost.

Wind Shear will still work on many boss abilities at low levels, so be ready to use it when you get the chance as Shamans have a fairly flexible and laid back rotation at this point. Spells you want to interrupt in particular are healing spells and AoE damage spells such as Chain Lightning. I could go into specifics, but this is a class guide, not a boss guide, so just use your own judgement.

Talent Spec: 29 Enhancement Shaman

  • Focused Strikes 3/3: Increases the damage dealt by your Primal Strike and Stormstrike abilities by 45%.
  • Elemental Weapons 2/2: Increases the passive bonuses granted by your Flametongue Weapon and Earthliving Weapon abilities by 40%, the damage of your extra attacks from Windfury Weapon by 40%, and the effectiveness of the ongoing benefits of your Unleash Elements ability by 50%.
  • Ancestral Swiftness 2/2: Reduces the cast time of your Ghost Wolf spell by 2 seconds and increases the movement speed by 15%. This does not stack with other movement speed increasing effects.
  • Flurry 3/3: Increases your attack speed by 30% for your next 3 swings after dealing a critical strike.
  • Stormstrike 1/1: [Instant cast, 8 second cooldown] Instantly strike an enemy with both weapons, dealing 125% weapon damage and granting you an additional 25% chance to critically strike the enemy with your Lightning Bolt, Chain Lightning, Lightning Shield, and Earth Shock spells for 15 seconds.

Glyphs

Prime Glyphs

With Lava Lash being a staple attack and the fact that you get it at level 10, this is my first choice of Prime Glyphs, increasing its damage by 20%. Next up is Stormstike, though you don’t get that spell until level 29, as the bonus crit can be useful. Finally I have Flame Shock listed though it’s important to note that it’s really only useful in LFG boss fights or in PvP as typical mobs and dungeon trash will not live long enough for even the normal duration to matter.

Major Glyphs

Lightning Shield is overall going to be the most useful glyph for you here; it’s how you turn your Lightning Shield into a solid 10 minute buff instead of lasting only for three hits worth. Ghost Wolf is my next choice because moving faster is always a good thing, both in PvE and PvP. Frost Shock deserves a mention for those of you interested in getting into some low level PvP, though I would generally suggest Ghost Wolf above this one.

Fire Nova is probably the best investment if you’re looking to beef up your AoE ability in dungeons by increasing its radius and taking away the hassle of replanting your totems. Chain Lightning is one I haven’t used myself, but it deserves a mention for AoE if you enjoy it.

Minor Glyphs

I’m a huge fan of getting rid of reagents, so Water Walking is the definite first choice here. Arctic Wolf is a simple vanity glyph that just changes the way you look in Ghost Wolf form. The only other Minor Glyph available at this level range is Thunderstorm which is a spell that only Elemental Shamans can use, so it’s completely worthless to you.

Gearing Up Your Shaman
As Enhancement your primary stat is Agility. Each point gives you 2 Attack Power and it also boosts your Melee Crit (and Dodge). Intellect boosts your Spell Power on a 1:1 ratio, and it also increases your Spell Crit and your mana. Strength is a decent stat for you as it still gives a 1:1 ratio for Attack Power, but it’s not something you really want to seek out unless you just cannot find any Agility pieces at all for those slots.

You also want to look for gear with Hit on it in particular since you take a penalty to melee hits for dual wielding. You don’t need a ton of Hit to get you by while you’re leveling, but if you find some good Agility pieces that also have Hit on them then be sure to pick them up.

For green gear with random enchants you’re probably most interested in “..of the Falcon” (Agility and Intellect), “..of the Tiger” (Agility and Strength), and “..of the Monkey” (Agility and Stamina).

As you get into running random dungeons you’re looking for items with the “..of Agility” and “..of the Bandit” (Agility, Stamina, and Crit) enchant on them from the Satchel of Helpful Goods.

There are two ways you can look at gearing up your low level Shaman. You can either go for maximum killing potential, which is stacking Agility above all else, or you can go with a more balanced build where you look for gear with both Agility and Stamina. I prefer maximizing my damage potential, personally, and going for good survival pieces in slots that I have no Agility piece to fill in. If you’re not used to healing on the fly as a DPS spec though, you might want to lean more towards survival.

Dungeon Gear
There are a lot of good pieces of gear that you can find in low level dungeons, some of them pretty decent and some rather outstanding. I’m not going to go into detail as far as which pieces to pair up from which dungeons to get a “best in slot” list, but I will give you a list of the items that if they dropped for me, I would consider rolling on if they were an upgrade to what I currently had.

A lot of the “good” lower level gear is tuned more towards Strength, which is still good though it’s not great. Agility is where it’s at, so don’t pass up an Agility piece for a Strength piece unless the value is at least twice that of the Agility piece.

Ragefire Chasm
Oggleflint’s Inspirer: One-handed Mace, 3 Strength, 3 Crit
Subterranean Cap: Cloak, 4 Strength, 4 Agility
Hide Vest of the Hungerer: Chest, 4 Agility, 5 Stamina, 4 Crit

The Hide Vest is a quest reward available to Horde only.

The Deadmines
Defias Leather Set: 5 piece Leather armor set (Belt, BOots, Gloves, Legs, Chest)
Cape of the Brotherhood: Cloak, 5 Agility, 3 Stamina
Smelting Pants: Legs, 8 Agility, 4 Stamina, 4 Crit
Smite’s Reaver: One-handed Axe, 2 Strength, 3 Stamina, 2 Hit
Cookie’s Tenderizer: One-handed Mace, 3 Strength, 2 Stamina, 2 Hit
Cookie’s Meat Mallet: One-handed Mace, 3 Strength, 3 Stamina
Cookie’s Table Cloth: Cloak, 3 Agility, 3 Stamina

The last two items are both quest rewards, but the same quest and rewards exist for both factions.

The Defias Leather set is a great set to have, unfortunately the Chest is no longer available in the game now that Cataclysm has replaced the final boss. The four remaining pieces are still very good, but they all have low drop rates. The good thing about this set though, is that it’s all BoE so you do have a chance of finding it on the auction house.

Wailing Caverns
Glowing Lizardscale Cloak: Cloak, 6 Agility, 2 Stamina
Embrace of the Viper Set: 5 piece Leather armor set (Belt, Boots, Gloves, Legs, Chest)
Cobrahn’s Boots: Boots, 4 Agility, 5 Stamina, 4 Crit

Cobrahn’s Boots are a quest reward, available to both factions. The Embrace of the Viper set is an example of the exceptional armor. Unlike the Defias Leathers from Deadmines, all but one of the pieces from the Embrace set are BoP, so you’ll have to farm all but the Gloves yourself if you want them, but the drop rates are significantly higher than the Defias set.

Shadowfang Keep
Wolfmaster Cape: Cloak, 5 Agility, 3 Stamina
Silverlaine’s Family Seal: Ring, 5 Strength, 3 Stamina
Butcher’s Cleaver: One-handed Axe, 3 Agility, 3 Stamina
Baron’s Scepter: On-handed Mace, 2 Strength, 3 Stamina, 2 Hit
Black Wolf Bracers: Wrists, 3 Agility, 4 Stamina, 3 Crit
Shadowfang Spaulders: Shoulders, 4 Agility, 5 Stamina, 4 Crit

Blackfathom Deeps
Naga Battle Gloves: Gloves, 7 Agility, 7 Stamina
Bands of Serra’kis: Bracers, 5 Agility, 5 Stamina
Dusk-Stained Cloak: Cloak, 5 Strength, 5 Stamina
Band of the Skull Crusher: Ring, 7 Strength
Aluwyn’s Legguards: Legs, 8 Agility, 10 Stamina

The last three items are all Alliance-only quest rewards.

The Naga Battle Gloves have a pretty high drop rate, so if you haven’t scored better gloves then these are a really good and pretty easily obtained option.

The Stockades
Hogger’s Trousers: Legs, 9 Agility, 9 Hit
Standard Issue Prisoner Shoes: Boots, 8 Agility, 5 Stamina
Rifle Commander’s Eyepatch: Helm, 8 Agility, 11 Stamina, 8 Hit

These are all really great items, especially the legs and helm. As a dual wielding class Hit rating is important because you take a penalty for wielding two weapons, and both of these pack a great amount of Hit as well as exceptional Agility and Stamina.

Gnomeregan
Charged Gear: Ring, 4 Arcane Resist, 4 Nature Resist, (Random Enchant)
Temple’s Vest: Chest, 7 Agility, 11 Stamina, 7 Crit

Temple’s Vest is an Alliance-only quest reward.

The Charged gear by itself looks pretty crappy, I know. But, the random enchant on it can be exceptional. You’re looking for “Charged Gear of..”: the Tiger (7 Agi, 7 Str), the Falcon (7 Agi, 7 Int), the Monkey (7 Agi, 7 Stam), Agility (10 Agi), or Strength (10 Str). I listed those in the order I would personally rank them, with “..of the Tiger” coming out on top as it provides a total of 21 Attack Power.

PvP Rewards
Sentinel’s Medallion: Neck, 8 Agility, 5 Stamina
Defiler’s Chain Greaves: Boots, 8 Agility, 8 Stamina, Increased Run Speed

Both of these items can be purchased with Honor, and you can get all the honor you need for them in about 2-3 Battlegrounds worth of fighting. The run speed on the boots is particularly worth looking into, even if the stats themselves aren’t as great as other boots you might already have.

There are two versions of the necklace, one for each faction. There are also multiple copies of them for different level ranges, so you can also get one of these for other level ranges, including level 19. You’ll have to travel to Ashenvale to purchase this as Alliance, and Northern Barrens as Horde since they are sold by the Warsong Gulch vendors.

The Boots come in multiple names as well as two versions of each for their respective factions. They also come in multiple level ranges just like the necklace, so you can keep coming back at different level ranges for definite upgrades, though you can’t get them for lower than the 29 bracket. To purchase these you’ll have to travel to Arathi Highlands for both factions, as the Arathi Basin vendors are the ones who sell them.

 

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Priest Leveling: 70-85 Shadow

If you’re just getting started on a Shadow Priest of your own, or considering one, then I suggest you take a look at the previous guides applicable to your level:
Priest Leveling: 1-29 Shadow
Priest Leveling: 30-49 Shadow
Priest Leveling: 50-69 Shadow

Playing a Shadow Priest
You’re going to find a couple of changes to how you play a Shadow Priest in this level range. The first thing is that you actually get an AoE spell at level 74. It’s not great, but it is useful if you’re in an AoE situation and you’ve already got your DoT’s spread around. The second change is that once you hit 81 you get a new spell that completely changes how you quest, called Mind Spike. I’ll get into the specifics of it down below, but for now just know that you have two methods of leveling through Cataclysm content at that point – DoT’s or Nukes.

We still run out of mana easily, but we also still have a lot of tools for getting that mana back. As we spend talent points in the Discipline tree we get even more ways to manage our mana successfully while also increasing our performance. Again, more on that down below.

Shadow-Specific Tips
Playing a Shadow Priest even at level 85 shares a lot of similarities to other classes. We’re part Warlock, part Mage, part (healer of choice), and 100% face melt. We have multiple play styles within a single spec, have excellent survivability spells, we heal while we kill, and we’re just plain fun to play.

The tips for playing Shadow in particular remain mostly the same. Finish off every mob that you can with Shadow Word: Death casts to trigger the mana regeneration from your talent points and glyphs, as that is the most common form of replenishing our mana. Speaking of replenishment, make sure you follow a rotation that allows you to take advantage of other forms of mana return, such as the Replenishment effect you get from casting Mind Blast on a target that already has your Vampiric Touch debuff active.

If you step away from your DoT rotation after level 81 and switch over to Mind Spike and Mind Blast, remember that you can still take advantage of your mana regenerating abilities, including Replenishment from Vampiric Touch and Mind Blast. Also remember that if you’re using the direct damage route rather than DoT’s, you’ll often encounter mobs while questing that die from the direct damage crits before you can trigger SW:Death returns so you might consider dropping back to a DoT rotation for a single mob now and then just to trigger those returns.

No matter which rotation you tend to use the most when you’re soloing or fighting dungeon trash, remember to stay flexible for the situation you’re in.

Mana Issues
Shadow Priests have mana issues no matter what level you are. The higher you get in level though, the more tools you get to manage your mana and restore it so that it’s less and less of an issue for you, but it’s not so much that the mana issues go away as it is you learning how to deal with them and get around them so that they no longer hinder your performance.

The following are your tools for managing your mana.

Vampiric Touch: Causes up to 10 party/raid members to regain 10% of their mana over 10 seconds if you cast Mind Blast on a target that’s inflicted with Vampiric Touch. Vampiric Touch itself has no cooldown, but the trigger for the replenishment effect (Mind Blast) has a default cooldown of 8 seconds which can be reduced to 6 seconds by spending 3 talent points in the Improved Mind Blast talent.

Shadow Word: Death: By itself does nothing for mana returns, however 2 talent points in the Masochism talent causes you to regain 10% of your mana instantly if you cast SW:Death and do not kill the target. The Glyph of Spirit Tap causes you to regain 12% of your mana over 12 seconds when you do kill a target with SW:Death. Default cooldown is 10 seconds, but the Glyph of Shadow Word: Death causes the cooldown to instantly refresh if you cast it on a target below 25% health if it doesn’t kill them which allows you to double-dip either Masochism for 20% mana instantly if they don’t die from both casts, or Masochism + Glyph of Spirit Tap for 10% mana instantly plus 12% mana over 12 seconds.

Dispersion: The keystone of the Shadow Talent tree, this ability restores 6% of your mana every second for 6 seconds, a total of 36% mana returned. Default cooldown is 2 minutes, but can be reduced to 75 seconds by use of the Glyph of Dispersion.

Shadowfiend: A summoned pet which restores 3% of your mana every time it attacks. Over it’s 15 second duration it averages around 10 attacks if it’s not killed or CC’ed in some manner, resulting in up to 30% mana return. Default cooldown is 5 minutes which can be reduced to 4 minutes with 2 talent points in Veiled Shadows, and 2 talent points in Sin and Punishment reduces the current cooldown by 10 seconds every time your Mind Flay crits.

Archangel: From the Discipline tree restores up to 25% of your mana instantly when you use it. In order to use Archangel you have to build stacks of Evangelism which you do by casting Mind Flay, resulting in 1 stack each time Mind Flay deals damage up to a maximum of 5 stacks, and each stack results in 5% mana returned by Archangel. Cooldown is 90 seconds.

Hymn of Hope: A channeled spell that restores 2% mana to up to 3 targets low on mana, ever 2 seconds for 8 seconds. It also increases the targets’ mana pools by 15% for 8 seconds (this effect is refreshed each time it ticks, so it lasts even after the channel). Cooldown is 6 minutes.

All of these effects allow you to replenish your mana at varying rates and amounts. Combined with one another they provide a vast amount of mana regen, enough even to go from 0 to full in a matter of seconds. One of the most effective ways to get your mana back if you need a large amount is to cast summon your Shadowfiend, channel Hymn of Hope, and then drop into Dispersion. Hymn of Hope’s 15% buff to your maximum mana means that the percentages of mana restored by Shadowfiend and Dispersion restore more per hit/tick than they would otherwise.

If you need some mana and you need it quick, toss a SW:Death cast on anything you can find that it won’t kill to regain 10% from the Masochism talent, follow that with two casts of Mind Flay to get 5 stacks of Evangelism and then pop Archangel for 25% mana instantly. That amount of mana should be enough to get you back on your feet and into a rotation that will restore even more mana if needed.

Important Spells & Abilities

  • Mass Dispel (72): Dispels magic in a 15 yard radius, removing 1 harmful spells from each friendly target and 1 beneficial spells from each enemy target. Affects a maximum of 10 friendly targets and 10 enemy targets. This dispel is potent enough to remove Magic effects that are normally undispellable.
  • Mind Sear (74): Causes an explosion of shadow magic around the target, causing 104 to 112 Shadow damage every 1 sec for 5 sec to all enemies within 10 yards around the target.
  • Mastery: Shadow Orb Power (80): Increases the damage done by your Shadow Orbs by 11.6%. Each point of Mastery increases damage by an additional 1.4%.
  • Mind Spike (81): Blasts the target for 1083 to 1143 Shadowfrost damage, but extinguishes your shadow damage-over-time effects from the target in the process. Mind Spike also increases the critical strike chance of your next Mind Blast on the target by 30%. Stacks up to 3 times.
  • Inner Will (83): A burst of Holy energy fills the caster, reducing the mana cost of instant cast spells by 15% and increasing your movement speed by 10%. Lasts 30 min.
  • Leap of Faith (85): You pull the spirit of the friendly party or raid target to you, instantly moving them directly in front of you.

Mass Dispel is a great spell to have, but one you probably won’t be casting very often unless the task is assigned to you in a raid or instance that has large scale AoE debuffs. I use it it PvP quite a bit, but basically never in PvE up to this point.

Mind Sear is our only Shadow AoE. It’s damage isn’t all that great, but it’s still a good option when you’ve got several mobs you want to damage at once when you’re in a group. The cool thing about it is that you can cast this on a friendly target because it doesn’t do anything to the actual target, instead it deals damage to everything around the target while you channel it. The bad thing is, it doesn’t deal damage to the target, so if you did cast it on a mob that mob doesn’t take damage from Mind Sear.

At level 80 we unlock our Mastery: Shadow Orb Power which gives us additional damage on our Shadow Orbs based on our Mastery stat. Our Mastery is pretty good, but I’ll leave it up to the experts to tell you how good and why.

Mind Spike is the spell that changes how we play, if we decide to use it. It’s a direct damage “nuke” spell that removes all of our DoT’s from the target with no benefit of doing so (unless you need to clear DoT’s off of a raid boss or something). It also puts a stacking debuff on the target that grants +30% Crit Chance to our next Mind Blast spell on the target, to a max of +90%. You now have the option of burning targets down with direct damage rather than waiting on your DoT’s to tick. I find the smoothest flow of questing is to use a combination of these two of different mobs I face at the same time, typically finishing my DoT target with SW:Death casts as the direct damage route often kills the mobs outright so that I can’t use SW:Death for mana regen.

Level 83 adds a new buff called Inner Will which gives a 10% movement buff it cuts the mana cost of your instant cast spells by 15%. Sadly you can’t have Inner Will and Inner Focus active at the same time, so I tend to use Inner Focus for the extra spellpower. It’s a good buff though, and one that I do take advantage of in certain PvP fights.

And our reward for reaching level 85 is Leap of Faith, more commonly known as “Life Grip”. It works just like the Death Knight spell Death Grip (hence the nickname), except that you cast it on your allies rather than your enemies. Its uses are endless, though most of them are mischievous. Just to point it out for the sake of completion, Leap of Faith is a Holy spell and it will take you out of Shadowform if you cast it.

Leveling a Shadow Priest

  • DoT Rotation: Vampiric Touch, Mind Blast, Shadow Word:Pain, Devouring Plague, Mind Flay, Shadow Word:Death
  • Same old DoT rotation we’ve been using. In Wrath content you probably don’t need the Devouring Plague cast in there, but it will help you while you’re leveling through Cataclysm. Sometimes I use it while questing, sometimes I don’t so just figure out which method you prefer and go with it.

    After level 81 I rarely bother with the DoT rotation while I’m soloing because it’s just faster to kill things with the direct damage.

  • Direct Damage Rotation: Mind Spike, Mind Spike, Mind Spike, Vampiric Touch, Mind Blast, (Mind Flay if 30% health or higher), SW:Death
  • This is the rotation I end up using the most right now. I sneak a Vampiric Touch cast in before my Mind Blast so that I trigger Replenishment just in case the direct damage spells are enough to kill the target before I can SW:Death.

    If you’re running low on mana and you’ve already spent talent points in Evangelism and Archangel, then I suggest you go ahead and skip SW:Death on the end and instead cast a second Mind Flay to build up your 5 stack of Evangelism. Once you have that 5th stack go ahead and cast SW:Death if the target isn’t already dead, but don’t worry about it if they die during the Mind Flays. Once you have the 5 stack go ahead and pop Archangel for 25% of your mana instantly returned. You also get a 20% damage buff to your direct damage Shadow spells while it’s active so just keep right on killing things while you’ve got your wings.

  • LFG Trash Rotation: Vampiric Touch (1 target), Mind Blast (same target), Shadow Word: Pain (all targets) , Mind Sear (on the tank), SW:Death when possible
  • This one changed once again thanks to our new spells that became available. Get Replenishment going first with VT>MB and then start the SW:Pain spam rolling on all of the targets (assuming they won’t die in .2 seconds anyway). Follow that with Mind Sear on your tank for AoE waves of death and snipe every kill you can with SW:Death when it’s off cooldown.

    If the trash isn’t going to last long enough for SW:Pain to be cast on them I suggest you use the Nuke Rotation above and just apply it to the tank’s target.

  • LFG Boss Rotations: Vampiric Touch, Mind Blast, Shadow Word: Pain, Devouring Plague, SW:Death, Shadowfiend (on cooldown), Mind Flay, Mind Blast, Mind Flay x2
  • Again, we’re going to get Replishment rolling first off, then we’re going to establish DoT’s. Reapply your DoT’s as needed, but remember your Mind Flay will refresh SW:Pain once you’ve spent your talent points to get the effect. Vampiric Touch (VT) will wear off before Devouring Plague (DP) will, and you’ll have enough time to cast 2-3 spells after refreshing VT before you need to refresh DP.

    Keep your DoT’s up at all times. If you need mana, get it. Shadowfiend, SW:Death, Replenishment (Vampiric Touch + Mind Blast), Dispersion, Archangel, and Hymn of Hope are all sitting there just waiting to be used, so don’t let yourself run dry for no reason. If you’re especially low on mana then cast your Shadowfiend first and follow it with an immediate Hymn of Hope. Both of them restore your mana by themselves, but Hymn has the added bonus of increasing the size of your mana pool and the amount of mana returned by the Shadowfiend is based on your maximum mana, so all of its attacks will restore more thanks to Hymn. If you’re still worried about mana when Hymn is done channeling, pop your Dispersion for another 36% mana.

    Talent Spec: 85 Shadow Priest

    • Twin Disciplines 3/3: Increases your Shadow and Holy spell damage and healing by 6%.
    • Mental Agility 2/3: Reduces the mana cost of your instant cast spells by 7%.
    • Evangelism 2/2: You have a 100% chance when you Smite and 100% chance when you Mind Flay to gain Evangelism. Stacks up to 5 times. Lasts for 20 seconds. [Dark Evangelism] Increases the damage done by your Periodic Shadow spells by 2%.
    • Archangel 1/1: Consumes your Evangelism effects, causing an effect depending what type of Evangelism effect is consumed. [Dark Archangel] Instantly restores 5% of your total mana and increases the damage done by your Mind Flay, Mind Spike, Mind Blast and Shadow Word: Death by 4% for each stack. Lasts for 18 seconds. 90 second cooldown.
    • Harnessed Shadows 2/2: Increases the chance for you to gain a Shadow Orb when dealing damage with your Mind Flay and Shadow Word: Pain by 8%, and you have a 100% chance to gain a Shadow Orb when critically hit by any attack.

    I decided to go straight into the Discipline tree once my mandatory 31 points had been placed in Shadow. I do go back and put a couple more points into Shadow at the end, but you get more benefit from reaching Evangelism/Archangel as early as possible.

    Twin Disciplines is a straight 6% bonus to our Shadow damage as well as our healing. We don’t do a whole lot of direct healing, but we do indirectly heal through abilities such as Devouring Plague which benefit here as well. Mental Agility will help with some of your mana issues, especially while you’re still killing everything with DoT’s.

    Evangelism by itself is is a nice bonus to your DoT damage, with 5 stacks granting them 10% more damage. When you combine it with Archangel though, it becomes both a damage increase and a mana returning tool. With all five stacks of Evangelism up casting Archangel will instantly restore 25% of your total mana and increase the damage of your direct damage spells by 20% for its duration. It also has the spiffy animation of giving you wings which just plain look cool.

    The last two points go back into the Shadow tree with Harnessed Shadows. Now that you can actually find and use the Mastery stat you might as well take advantage of getting extra use out of it, right? This talent helps you build up Shadow Orbs faster which increase your DPS when you cast Mind Blast or Mind Spike which consumes the orbs.

    Glyphs
    Level 75 opens the three remaining glyph slots, allowing for 3 of each type to be used.

    Prime Glyhphs

    • Glyph of Mind Flay: Increases the damage done by your Mind Flay spell by 10% when your target is afflicted with Shadow Word: Pain.
    • Glyph of Shadow Word: Pain: Increases the periodic damage of your Shadow Word: Pain by 10%.
    • Glyph of Shadow Word: Death: If your Shadow Word: Death fails to kill the target at or below 25% health, your Shadow Word: Death’s cooldown is instantly reset. This effect cannot occur more often than once every 6 sec.
    • Glyph of Dispersion: Reduces the cooldown on Dispersion by 45 sec.

    Primes for PvE
    I list the Prime Glyphs in the order that I suggest them. Mind Flay and Shadow Word: Pain are both great for your DPS, and the two I recommend most. Shadow Word: Death is another good option as it not only gives you a better chance of getting your Spirit Tap glyph and/or Masochism talent to proc, it also gives you a way to deal some quick burst damage to mobs or bosses that are low on health. Dispersion is a decent glyph if you’re looking for more survival or more mana regen. It drops the cooldown from 2 minutes to 1 minute and 15 seconds so you can use it a lot more often, but I’m not sure that you really need to cast it that often if you’re using the methods I’ve been discussing throughout these guides to help manage your mana.

    Primes for PvP
    Dispersion is a fantastic glyph for PvP as it reduces damage, clears movement impairments, and restores your mana all at the same time. Shadow Word: Death is the next one on the list because being able to double your SW:Death casts on a target near death is very important in the world of Resilience stacking. Last up is Shadow Word: Pain as it’s the most likely DoT for you to cast on multiple people at once and it’s damage is already good so you’re only making it that much better.

    Major Glyphs

    • Glyph of Spirit Tap: When you kill a target with your Shadow Word: Death and yield experience or honor, you instantly receive 12% of your total mana over 12 sec.
    • Glyph of Fade: Reduces the cooldown of your Fade spell by 9 sec.
    • Glyph of Psychic Scream: Targets of your Psychic Scream spell now tremble in place instead of fleeing in fear, but the cooldown of Psychic Scream is increased by 3 sec.
    • Glyph of Psychic Horror: Reduces the cooldown of your Psychic Horror by 60 30 sec.

    Majors for PvE
    Spirit Tap remains the top priority here, though with more mana tools coming out in this bracket you could probably drop it if you really wanted to without worrying too much…maybe. Fade is a really good option for me since I like to hit LFG now and then to help me level and it’s also good for PvP against pet classes as Fade will often make a pet leave you and target something else if you’ve not done anything to harm the pet. Psychic Scream is a good option if you’re going to do a lot of LFG leveling by making the mobs tremble in place instead of running off in random directions. Last up is Psychic Horror which cuts its cooldown in half by 30 seconds, though you’ll have to spend the talent point to get the spell in the first place before this glyph does you any good.

    Majors for PvP
    Fade is one of the more important glyphs in this bracket as reducing the cooldown of Fade means you’re able to break out of slows and snares more frequently thanks to the talent that adds that effect to Fade. Psychic Horror is next up on the list because it’s basically the key to you killing a healer as you’ll need to CC the snot out of them and then nail them with something like this to initiate the burn phase to bring them down. Psychic Scream is next up on my list because it allows you to still use the CC but also maintain control over the effect rather than having everyone run in random directions. Spirit Tap is still a really good glyph to use in PvP, but whether or not you use it I’ll leave up to you since you get more direct benefit from these others.

    Minor Glyphs

    Minors for PvE
    Minor glyphs are still really minor so take whatever you want. Levitate is my first option just because I like using spells like Levitate and don’t like having to keep a supply of some stupid reagent in my bags in order to use it. Fortitude is great if you’re into LFG and just decent otherwise. Fading isn’t a bad option, though it’s not especially good either. Shadowfiend has some real good potential, but I don’t think my Shadowfiend has died from damage even once so it wouldn’t do me much good right now.

    Minors for PvP
    I suggest you use Shadowfiend over Fading for PvP if you’re going to bother making any change here at all. Sometimes my Shadowfiend is CC’d, sometimes he’s left alone, and sometimes he’s killed. Levitate and Fortitude are still the best options overall.

    Gearing Up Your Priest
    At this level range you should have enough of your mana returning spells and effects that Spirit isn’t quite so important now as far as mana is concerned. Spirit is still a good stat to have, especially with points in Twisted Faith turning it into Hit Rating, but at this point I wouldn’t bother stacking it above other stats that are more important to your DPS.

    Stat Priority: Intellect > Haste > Crit > Spirit

    Once you hit level 78 you might want to take a look at the Auction House for any green quality items from Cataclysm that are significant upgrades to your existing Wrath gear. You’ll likely replace it soon anyway, so don’t spend a fortune on it, just pick up any cheap pieces that are significant upgrades.

    Once you reach level 80 you can start to equip pieces of the Deathsilk Set made by tailors which is an excellent starting set for a Shadow Priest entering Cataclysm zones. There are eight pieces in the whole set, four of which can be used at level 80 and the other four at level 81. The full set provides almost 20,000 health and mana, over 1,300 Spellpower, 334 Haste, and a great amount of Hit, Crit, and Mastery as well. In total this set requires the following mats to craft from scratch:

    When you reach level 85 I suggest you pick up yet another tailor-made set of gear, though technically it’s not a “set” since there’s no bonus for wearing additional pieces. As with the Deathsilk set above, there are a total of eight pieces in this “set”, but all eight require level 85. Technically this gear is PvP gear since it has resilience on it, but due to the fact that Blizzard decided to make all of the level 85 crafted cloth gear PvP gear you’re just kind of out of luck. Luckily, the set has excellent stats anyway so it’s still a great place to start. With this set you’ll receive almost 28,000 health and mana, 1,800 Spellpower, 378 Haste, and even more Crit and Mastery, though the bonus to hit that Deathsilk offers is replaced by the Resilience stat for this set. In total this set requires the following mats to craft from scratch:

     
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    Posted by on March 8, 2011 in Caster, Class, Guide, Leveling, Priest

     

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    Paladin Leveling: 70-85 Protection

    Here we are now in the final stretch, finishing up Wrath content and both starting and finishing Cataclysm leveling content as you prepare for your gear and reputation grinds as you strive to get your gear improved enough for heroics and eventually raids as well.

    This guide will get you all the way to the level cap so you’ll have all of your spells and talents available to you at the end of this. If you aren’t already familiar with your various cooldowns and buffs, then now is the time to learn them. Go queue yourself up for a random dungeon and make a point of using all of your cooldowns at some point. If you’re still under level 81 then queue for Wrath dungeons so that you don’t have to worry about new mechanics just yet, and focus on learning how and when to use the spells you may have been ignoring up to this point.

    As always, remember that my guides are focused on getting you leveled up. I’m not here to get you ready for raiding, that’s for other bloggers who focus specifically on certain classes and the raiding aspect of the game.

    Playing a Protection Paladin
    So now you’re in Northrend level content and moving up towards Cataclysm content and the level cap. As far as playing your Prot Pally goes there’s not much difference at all, save that Northrend mobs are harder than Outlands mobs and Cataclysm mobs are harder than Northrend mobs. You can still do big AoE pulls in all the content you’ll level through in this range, though I suggest you go back to starting with small pulls of 2-4 until you get a feel for the mobs and then work your way up to bigger groups.

    Questing as Prot is both simple and effective. Keep on doing what you’ve been doing the whole time, keep an eye on your health when you enter new areas so you know what to expect in the way of healing and pulling, but otherwise just have at it.

    If you’re looking for specs, rotations, gear guides, and so forth for getting into heroics and raids, then I direct you to Righteous Defense, a blog written by my buddy @Rhidach, who I consider my go-to source for end game Paladin information.

    Protection-Specific Tips
    I don’t have much in the way of specific tips for you in this level range other than I love taking advantage of kill quests to use my AoE. I didn’t have any trouble at all with Northrend group quests until I got to the last couple of levels in Northrend, there’s one Group 5 quest in Ice Crown that I couldn’t handle at 78. Not a big deal, I just skipped it and went on to other quests.

    As you get into Cataclysm you’ll notice a big jump in how powerful mobs are compared to how relatively weak your gear is if you’re leveling straight through and weren’t raiding in Wrath before. While not specific to Prot, I suggest you check the Auction House or your crafting alts to get yourself some Cataclysm gear from level 78 on. Get yourself a new set of armor, a new weapon, and a new shield. You should be able to get a couple of rings and a neck for fairly cheap since Jewelcrafters mass produce them to level their profession. A good weapon and shield are probably going to cost you a couple hundred gold each, but it’ll be worth it.

    Important Spells & Abilities

    Level 70-85:

    • Avenging Wrath: Increases all damage and healing caused by 20% for 20 sec.
    • Resistance Aura: Gives additional Fire, Frost and Shadow resistance to all party and raid members within 40 yards. Players may only have one Aura on them per Paladin at any one time.
    • Turn Evil: The targeted undead or demon enemy will be compelled to flee for up to 20 sec. Damage caused may interrupt the effect. Only one target can be turned at a time.
    • Hand of Sacrifice: Places a Hand on the party or raid member, transfering 30% damage taken to the caster. Lasts 12 sec or until the caster has transfered 100% of their maximum health. Players may only have one Hand on them per Paladin at any one time.
    • Mastery: Divine Bulwark: Increases your chance to block melee attacks by 18%. Each point of Mastery increases block chance by an additional 2.25%.
    • Inquisition: Consumes all Holy Power to increase your Holy Damage by 30%. Lasts 4 sec per charge of Holy Power consumed.
    • Divine Radiance: Heals all friendly targets within 0 yards for up to 683 every sec, with effectiveness diminishing on targets farther than 8 yards away and for each additional player target beyond 6. Lasts 10 sec.
    • Guardian of Ancient Kings: Summons an Ancient Guardian who reduces all damage taken by 50% for 12 seconds.

    Avenging Wrath, at level 72, is what gives your Paladin their “wings”. It’s a flat 20% increase in damage and healing that you do. It’s a great buff and you should use it whenever you have the opportunity to do so, whether you’re solo questing or tanking.

    Level 76 gives you Resistance Aura which is a pretty decent buff when used at the right now. If you’re in a situation where you’re going to take elemental damage and you don’t particularly need any of your other auras, then you might as well use this one. If you aren’t taking significant elemental damage though, I wouldn’t bother with it. As Protection Paladins we can take a melee style beating for days and just keep right on going, but we have very little resistance to Magic damage, so if you find yourself facing a lot of casters it might be a good idea to switch this baby on for a bit.

    At level 78 you’re able to send the fear of righteousness into undead and demons thanks to Turn Evil. It’s a fear spell that can only target Undead and Demons, but at least it’s somewhat reliable CC when it can be used. There aren’t a whole lot of undead in Cataclysm, but there are some demons hanging around here and there. Honestly I only use this in AoE situations so that I can get a mob to socially agro his buddies for me. I leave the CC to other classes when I’m tanking.

    At level 80 you get both Hand of Sacrifice and access to your Mastery, Divine Bulwark. Hand of Sacrifice is a great spell for saving the lives of your teammates by taking 30% of the damage they deal and directing it to yourself instead. The only time I cast this as a tank is when my healer is taking damage and my taunts are on cooldown. I use this a lot more during the rare moments I’m in a spec other than Prot. We make great use of our Mastery stat.

    Level 81 sends in the (Spanish) Inquisition, our final method of burning Holy Power, this time to increase our Holy Damage. I’m not going to lie to you, I forget this thing exists constantly. It seems to me it’s more of a DPS spell, though it could of course be used for tanking as well. I generally don’t bother with it, but that’s me.

    Level 83 brings Holy Radiance which is an AoE heal centered on you that heals for more the closer they are to you. I actually like using this as Prot, even though it’s a heal and my heals typically suck. It’s something I can cast during combat to add a little buffer to myself and the other melee DPS. When I talk about the 939 rotation down below, this is one of those spells I fit into a 9-slot that doesn’t typically belong there.

    And finally, level 85 gives us Guardian of Ancient Kings, a spell that has a different effect based on your spec. For Prot that means we get 50% damage reduction for 12 seconds. It’s a great way to mitigate some damage and ease up the load on your healers, or to add some more survivability when you’re solo grinding large packs of mobs.

    Leveling a Protection Paladin
    Buffs List: Righteous Fury, Seal of Insight/Truth, Blessing of Might/Kings, Retribution/Devotion Aura
    Multi-Target Rotation: Avenger’s Shield, Hammer of the Righteous, Holy Wrath, Hammer of the Righteous, Judgement, Hammer of the Righteous
    Single-Target Rotation: Exorcism, Avenger’s Shield, Crusader Strike, Judgement, Crusader Strike, Holy Wrath, Crusader Strike, Shield of the Righteous
    Boss Rotation 1: Avenger’s Shield, Judgement, Divine Plea, Shield of the Righteous, Crusader Strike, Holy Wrath, Crusader Strike, Judgement, Crusader Strike, Shield of the Righteous
    Boss Rotation 2: Divine Plea, Shield of the Righteous, Crusader Strike, Judgement, Avenger’s Shield, Consecrate, Holy Wrath, “939”

    The Buffs List contains the buffs you should have up at all times. You’ll notice that most of those have a This/That option as well. I tend to use Seal of Insight at all times while I’m leveling. Most mobs aren’t going to live long enough to make SoTruth worth it, and it’s better to keep your life and mana topped off instead. For Blessings I generally use Might when soloing and Kings when I’m in a group or a Battle Ground. The Aura is up to you, though I lean towards Retribution unless I’m taking a ton of damage.

    The reason why the Boss Rotation 1 changes from everything else we’re doing is because you want to start off as strong as possible on the threat front. This is my own preference for boss fights, it’s how I like to handle them. Avenger’s Shield and Judgement give you a decent start on threat but the real kicker is using Divine Plea which your talents trigger to give you 3 Holy Power and Shield of the Righteousness burns those three for a big burst of threat as well. Doing this should put you far enough ahead of all your DPS that you won’t have to worry about them pulling off of you. Also, if you have your Avenger’s Shield cooldown reset from your talent procs go ahead and fit it in whenever you have a moment to do so.

    Boss Rotation 2 brings up the mysterious Paladin rotation known as 939. Prior to 939 you’re building up your threat with various cooldowns and then settling into the 939 rotation. See the following section for details on what 939 is, and how to use it.

    Understanding the 939 Rotation
    939 – Those numbers more or less represent the cooldowns of your spells. The 9’s represent your longer cooldown attacks while the 3’s always represent Crusader Strike (single target) or Hammer of the Righteous (AoE). So the basic idea to do Special Attack > Crusader Strike > Special Attack, and repeat that over and over. That’s why Paladins are “so easy” to tank with, because they have a literal rotation and it’s easy to follow.

    The easy part of 939 is remembering that you’re going to use Crusader Strike or Hammer of Righteousness every time they’re off cooldown, which will end up being every-other attack.

    The “hard” part, which really isn’t hard, is remembering when to use your 9’s, which are all of your other special attacks. On one hand you could say to just use whatever happens to not be on cooldown and you’ll probably do just fine while you’re leveling. But the key to making 939 work, and work well, is knowing the priority of your 9’s.

    Before you learn their priority, you probably need to know what the 9’s are: Judgement, Avenger’s Shield, Holy Wrath, and Shield of the Righteous. There are also a couple of spells that can fill the 9’s slot that don’t have a dedicated place in the rotation and instead are used as needed in a 9 slot: Word of Glory, Consecration, Hammer of Wrath, Hammer of Justice, and Rebuke.

    Priority of 9’s: Shield of the Righteous (only with 3 Holy Power), Judgement, [Exception*], Avenger’s Shield, Consecration, Holy Wrath

    Shield of the Righteous takes the top spot because if you don’t use it when you’re sitting at 3 Holy Power then you’re going to waste Holy Power with the next Crusader/Hammer cast that you make unless you throw off your whole rotation. Judgement provides you with a lot of different beneficial effects, so use it when you can to reap the benefits.

    The [Exception*] is when the target is below 20% health. In those situations Hammer of Wrath takes a priority slot right behind Judgement. If you don’t have 3 Holy Power yet and Judgement isn’t on cooldown, cast Hammer of Wrath before all the others.

    Avenger’s Shield, Consecration, and Holy Wrath fill out the remainder of the priority list. I’m not a big fan of Consecration in this expansion, so I usually leave it out completely, but that’s just me.

    The other spells I mentioned being able to fill your 9’s slots with are all situational. You won’t necessarily be able to fit in a Hammer of Justice or Rebuke cast on the 9 slot as interrupts are usually needed right now instead of whenever it’s convenient for you, and if you’re in desperate need of a Word of Glory heal then of course you need it when you need it.

    Talent Spec: Protection 85

    • Improved Judgement 2/2: Increases the range of your Judgement by 20 yards.
    • Crusade 3/3: Increases the damage of your Crusader Strike, Hammer of the Righteous, and Templar’s Verdict by 30%, and the damage and healing of your Holy Shock by 30%. In addition, for 15 sec after you kill an enemy that yields experience or honor, your next Holy Light heals for an additional 300%.
    • Pursuit of Justice 2/2: You have a 100% chance to gain a charge of Holy Power when struck by a Stun, Fear or Immobilize effect. In addition, increases your movement and mounted movement speed by 15%. This effect does not stack with other movement speed increasing effects.
    • Rule of Law 3/3: Increases the critical effect chance of your Crusader Strike, Hammer of the Righteous and Word of Glory by 15%.

    I like to take Improved Judgement as my first point outside of the Prot tree. It’s great for pulling additional mobs, patrols, or adds when you don’t have a taunt handy (or want to save it), and for having more to do while you’re rushing in on a boss. It’s not required, but I like it a lot personally. Switching these points to Eye for an Eye would be a decent alternative I imagine.

    Crusade is a flat damage increase of 30% to two of our most frequently used spells: Crusader Strike and Hammer of the Righteous. I also like it for the 300% healing from Holy Light after you kill an honor/experience target so that I can easily top off after a big pull with a single, cheap heal.

    Pursuit of Justice is a great little talent. First it gives free Holy Power when you’re stunned, feared, or immobilized and then it has the added benefit of increasing your movement speed by 15% on top of it. Increasing your speed from talents frees up an enchant slot on your boots too.

    We finish off our talent points with Rule of Law, increasing the crit chance of three of our most common spells.

    Again, I want to point out that my guides are here to help you level your toon, not necessarily to get your ready for raiding and farming heroics. If you want to get serious about end game content then you’re much better off looking at someone who’s focused on end game. I level, it’s what I do, and I can help you with that just fine, but end game is not my strong point.

    Glyphs
    All of your glyph slots will be open to you as of level 75, so you’ve now got 3 of each type to fill. Glyphs are listed in the order I would suggest you take them from a leveling perspective.

    Prime

    Now that all of our glyph slots are open, it’s time to fill them up with the good stuff. I list these in the order I suggest that you take them.

    Major

    Again, I list these in the order I suggest you take them. One glyph that might stand out as an oddity to you is the Glyph of Lay on Hands. I mention it solely because of the mana issues that many people are having right now, especially healers. Lay on Hands restores a lot of health, but it also restores some mana to the target as well, and being able to use this on a healer who’s out of mana can be the difference between a loot roll and a corpse run.

    Minor

    Paladin minor glyphs are crap. We get six glyphs that all do exactly the same thing, reducing mana cost of their respective spells by 50%. Grab the three you cast most often and go with it.

    Gearing Up as Protection
    As a melee class we’re looking for stats that impact our melee performance such as Strength, Attack Power, Hit, Crit and Haste. As a tank though, you also want to look for survival stats such as Stamina, Dodge and Parry.

    Stat Priority: Strength and Stamina, Mastery, Dodge and Parry, Other melee stuff

    Use that as a general guide for your stats. If you’re looking to get geared up for heroics and raids then I suggest you do a little more research elsewhere to find the actual stat weights.

     
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    Posted by on February 16, 2011 in Class, Guide, Leveling, Melee, Paladin

     

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    Professions Leveling: Mining 1-525

    Well folks, it’s time for another gathering post in the series of Leveling Professions. This time we’re going to take a look at Mining, one of the most profitable gathering professions in the game, both directly and indirectly.

    Mining is the primary gathering profession of Blacksmithing, Engineering, and Jewelcrafting, and it provides mats which are often used in Alchemy as well.

    As I’ve said before, gathering professions are where I tend to venture away from the guides at WoW-Professions.com, because I have my own paths I like to travel to get specific items that I know sell for more or are used for more items that what the guide tells you. You can click on this link to find their Mining Leveling Guide, and this one if you’d like to level 1-375 with their Smelting Guide.

    I’m going to go through the leveling guide and give you the information that you don’t find at WoW-Professions. I’ll go over how/where I personally go about leveling them (where I deviate from their guides), and some things I like or dislike about the profession. I’ll also give a few tips on how I make gold with the profession, or ways that I might put it to use that aren’t apparent to everyone.

    Getting Started: Materials
    As a gathering profession, Mining doesn’t need anything in the way of actual mats of course. However, it does require you to devote one item in your bags to an item that works as a Mining Pick. You can get the actual Mining Pick or any number of weapons that count as one. You can also use a Gnomish Army Knife which I have about a dozen of to pass around to my toons so they always have the basic tools for any profession. You can buy a pick from almost any trade goods vendor in the game as well as Blacksmithing Supplies and Mining Supplies vendors.

    Special Note: One good thing about Mining is that even when nodes are green to you they still have a very high chance of awarding a skill point because of how few nodes there are. Herbalism has a lot of nodes, so the chance of getting skills on green nodes is fairly low, Skinning has even more “nodes” so skill points on green skins are rare, but Mining has the fewest nodes of all gathering professions so it has a high skill up chance on greens to make up for that fact.

    There are a few items and enchants that give you a bonus to your Mining skill that can help you move forward to new types of ore a bit faster.
    Enchant Gloves – Mining: Use: Teaches you how to permanently enchant gloves to increase mining skill by 2.
    Enchant Gloves – Advanced Mining: Use: Teaches you how to permanently enchant gloves to increase mining skill by 5.
    Goblin Mining Helmet: Equip: Mining +5.
    Enchant Gloves – Gathering: Permanently enchant gloves to increase Herbalism, Mining, and Skinning by 5. Requires a level 60 or higher item.

    I keep a pair of white-quality Cloth gloves that have the enchant for each of the gathering professions (the individual enchants for each, not Gatherer) on them to pass around to toons while leveling. I almost always level miners with a pair of enchanted gloves to help them gather, mostly for when you start getting towards the end of vanilla content and beyond where you’ll find “rich” nodes in the same zones as regular nodes.

    I wouldn’t bother with the +2 Mining enchant unless that’s really all you can find, and even then I’d probably skip it. Advanced Mining and Gathering are both decent enchants to use, but like I said I don’t often use Gathering because I like to be able to use these kinds of items on low level toons and Gatherer requires high level items to use it.

    The Goblin Mining Helmet isn’t bad, but it has some requirements that make it hard for a lot of toons to use it. First off it requires you to be able to equip Mail armor so half of the classes can never use it. Second, it requires an Engineering skill of 205 which means you have to have Engineering as your 2nd profession to use it, and you have to be at least level 20 you get your skill level high enough. But if you’re questing in a zone that has mining nodes more than 5 levels above your current skill level then you’re probably better off going back to a lower level zone to level up anyway.

    Trouble Areas
    Luckily, recent patches and expansions have done a world of good in smoothing out the bottlenecks of leveling the Mining profession. The number of nodes have been drastically increased, placement around the world has been improved so that you find ores you need in more zones and across more evenly spread level ranges, and minimum requirements to use the profession in each expansion’s content have been lowered.

    If you’re just leveling Mining itself, then you don’t have to worry about bottlenecks very much at all now. The one slight exception is 375+ where you can no longer smelt your ore for additional skill points. However, spending about an hour in any of the top 3 zones in Northrend should yield enough Saronite nodes to push you easily to the minimum requirements for Cataclysm nodes (425).

    If you’re leveling Mining to fuel a crafting profession though, then of course you’re going to need massive amounts of certain ores/bars to craft all of the items that you need. And that’s where the following information can help.

    The following are Ores that are required in a significantly higher amount that other ores in relation to certain crafting professions. Also note that the numbers given are for the amount of Ore required to make the number of Bars required to level the respective crafting professions.

    Mithril Ore: [BS 320, Eng 161, JC 140]
    This is your first big stumbling block as a Blacksmith. Up to this point Iron has been your biggest time sink and you need less than 200 of that. You’ll need 320 Mithril Ore to level a Blacksmith and that’s a lot of ore. Engineers and Jewelcrafters need a fair amount of Mithril as well, but not nearly as much as Blacksmiths.

    My favorite place to farm Mithril is Badlands. It doesn’t have the highest number of nodes in it (Thousand Needles does), but one big benefit it has over all of the other zones that do have higher node-counts is that it’s mostly flat ground (so easy to farm without a flying mount) and the nodes are very close together and spread out perfectly along the edge of the zone. Just while leveling there for a short time on my Shadow Priest recently I got over half of what you would need as a Blacksmith in this zone alone, and as much again in Burning Steppes.

    Thorium Ore: [BS 420, Eng 189, JC 50]
    Thorium is next up on the list, and if you’re a Blacksmith then this is the second worst grind you’re going to face for a single type of ore. Thorium is easier to come by than it used to be, but it can still be a pain, especially if you need a lot of it. With a 420 Ore requirement for Blacksmithing you can get an idea of why so many people hate leveling BS and consider it a massive time/gold/material sink – because that’s what it is. Engineers need a fair amount of Thorium as well, but again less than half of what a BS does. Jewelcrafting might only use 50 Thorium Bars in their leveling, but a lot of the gems that need to finish off vanilla patterns are found from Thorium Ore making that number of 50 somewhat incorrect. You only need 50 bars, but if you can’t get your hands on the gems themselves then you’ll need much more than that in raw ore for Prospecting.

    My preference for farming Thorium Ore is Un’Goro Crater. Just like my Mithril spot above, it doesn’t have the highest number of ore nodes (Winterspring does), but it does have a more farmer-friendly layout. The zone is relatively flat, though there are some times you’ll need to go up into the mountains around the edge of the zone to find your nodes. The best trait of the zone is that it’s almost perfectly round and most of the nodes are found around the outside ring, making farming there very simple and easy to do.

    Cobalt Ore: [BS 320, Eng 324, JC -]
    Cobalt Ore is the next bottleneck, the first ore of Nothrend. Blacksmiths need 320 Ore, but they’re outmatched this time by the Engineers who need 324. Jewelcrafters don’t need this ore in particular because we’ve now stepped away from Jewelry as the primary product of JC and now we’re looking more at Gems and what Jewelry we do have is mostly made with Eternals instead of smelted bars. That said though, you don’t really need all that much ore to level through Northrend content as a JC.

    I hate farming Cobalt Ore; Of all the ores that WoW has to offer, Cobalt sucks the most. Well, not counting the uncommon nodes, of course. There are five primary zones that you can farm Cobalt, and while all of them offer a decent number of node locations, none of them are really set up for easy farming. The highest concentration of nodes is in Zul’drak, but I really don’t like the layout of the zone and the placement of the ore nodes there, so I usually avoid the place. Instead I prefer to farm in Howling Fjord because it has the simplest farming paths and many of the nodes can be farmed at-level without much risk of pulling nearby mobs because it has a large concentration of non-aggressive beasts and many nodes don’t have any mobs around them at all.

    Elementium Ore: [BS 708, Eng 224, JC -]
    Last up on our bottleneck list is Elementium, the highest common ore of the Cataclysm expansion. Blacksmiths will prepare for their worse ore farming spree yet with 708 Ore (354 Bars) needed to level their profession. Engineers don’t even come close with their 224 Ore (112 Bars) needed, and Jewelcrafters don’t necessarily need any of it at all.

    While Deepholm supposedly has the highest number of Elementium nodes available, it’s also one of the most frequently farmed locations for it. Twilight Highlands is listed as having the second highest Elementium population, and Uldum the third. I’ve farmed in all three of these locations, and while Deepholm used to have Elementium everywhere you looked it’s now almost barren. Twilight Highlands is sort of the premium farming spot for almost everything so finding ore there sucks as well. So Uldum is my choice for farming Elementium even though the layout of the zone sucks compared to Deepholm’s circular setup.

    For this bottleneck I’m going to have to say that you’re better off finding your own favorite spot on your server. Since this is new content these nodes will be targeted more than all of the others above, and each server has its own economy that will determine where you should farm or if you should even bother farming at all. It could be that your server is so full of farmers that your only real option is to farm the Auction House instead.

    Psynister Preferences
    I don’t really follow the WoW-Professions guide much at all when I’m farming ore. I have followed their smelting guide, but generally I don’t power level Mining for the sake of having Mining, I do it to fuel a crafting profession. Because of that I don’t want to just reach the next level for the newest types of ore, I need to find good places to farm for certain types of ore and gather until I have enough for what I’m going to make.

    As I mentioned before though, I also enjoy PvP twinking and like to keep a store of mats for power leveling my twinks’ professions, so I always farm more than I need so that I can keep my twink guild bank stored with whatever mats I need.

    If you’re farming ore so that you can sell the ore/bars raw on the Auction House, it’s always good to know where the market stands on each type of ore, and what else you might be able to do with that ore by using any crafting professions you have access to that use it.

    Before you sell your ore, always check the value of the bars you can make with it first. You might think that you’re making a kill selling a stack of ore for 90g, but you might be ripping yourself off if you could have smelted that ore and sold the stack of bars for 140g. It’s more common in bars that require 2 of their respective ores to craft instead of only 1, but I’ve turned even stacks of Copper Ore into Bars and sold them for 4x the profit before.

    While it can be a hassle if you’re not used to it, it’s also a good idea to get to know your crafting professions well so that you know what you can craft with which type of mats. If you have a Blacksmith then you might want to consider not selling your Mithril/Thorium (the same for Fel Iron/Adamantite, Cobalt/Saronite, and Obsidium/Elementium) until you check the prices for Plate Tanking gear that you can make with that ore to see if it’s more valuable. When you’re dealing in Northrend and Cataclysm mats you may also want to check the prices on Plate DPS gear, especially those pieces that have Resilience and are good for PvP as they often sell well (server depending, of course).

    If you have a Jewelcrafter then you might want to keep yourself familiar with the value of gems that you can prospect as well. You’ll rarely get more money prospecting Outlands ore than you would for selling the ore itself, and for the most part the same is true for Northrend. But for some vanilla gems and even some Cataclysm gems, sometimes you can get more money from prospecting than you can from the ore.

    Your other option is to craft things with a BS/Eng/JC and then disenchant them with an Enchanter to then sell the enchanting mats or enchanting scrolls on the Auction House. You can search for details on this type of thing at various websites by searching for “Saronite Shuffle” or “Obsidium Shuffle” which can give you the basics. Some of it applies to just those particular ores, but you can apply the concept even to vanilla and Outlands ores as well.

    Power Leveling List

    From WoW-Professions.com:

    1 – 60 Durotar, Dun Morogh
    60 – 110 Barrens, Loch Modan
    110 – 185 Ashenvale, Wetlands
    185 – 205 Dustwallow Marsh, Hinterlands
    205 – 265 Thousand Needles
    265 – 300 Un’Goro Crater
    300-360 Hellfire Peninsula, Nagrand
    360-450 Borean Tundra, Sholazar Basin
    450-525 Mount Hyjal

    Guide Sections:
    1 – 65 – Copper Ore
    65 – 125 – Tin Ore
    125 – 175 – Iron Ore
    175 – 230 – Mithril Ore
    230 – 300 – Thorium Ore
    300 – 325 – Fel Iron Ore
    325 – 350 – Adamantite Ore
    350 – 400 – Cobalt Ore
    400 – 425 – Saronite Ore
    425 – 475 – Obsidium Ore
    475 – 525 – Elementium Ore

     
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    Posted by on February 11, 2011 in Guide, Leveling, Professions

     

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    Priest Leveling: 50-69 Shadow

    If you’re just getting started on a Shadow Priest of your own, or considering one, then I suggest you take a look at the previous guides applicable to your level:
    Priest Leveling: 1-29 Shadow
    Priest Leveling: 30-49 Shadow

    Playing a Shadow Priest
    There aren’t really all that many changes in how you’ll play your Shadow Priest in this level compared to the last 20 levels. While you get a lot of helpful spells and talent points, none of them really impact how you actually play your class. The biggest change is that you get even more ways to restore your mana so that you can more liberally spread your DoT’s around to multiple targets without having to worry about your mana.

    Shadow-Specific Tips
    If you’ve been following along with my other guides then you’ll know that mana has been an issue for us for some time. Hopefully you’ve been seeing the same thing I have, in that mana issues for the most part disappear in the 30’s or 40’s. Well in this bracket we get even more tools to help us with mana regeneration, allowing you to become a bit more aggressive in combat.

    Continuing on with the Jedi analogy, this is where you get to stop hiding in the shadows like some wrinke-faced Sith Lord and go whip out a dual lightsaber of doom like Darth Maul. Now sure, Maul ended up falling to pieces in that horrible Episode 1, but you can’t deny that he was the coolest thing we’d seen up to that point.

    What does that have to do with anything? Well I’ll tell you what it ha- WHAT’S THAT OVER THERE!??!??!?

    I’m sorry, you were saying? Yeah, I forgot too. So anyway, yes the Shadow Priest is an awesome class to play and now that we’ve got the mana issues under control it’s time to start really start embracing the Shadow and start dishing out the damage.

    Important Spells & Abilities
    We do get a few new spells in this level range, but only a couple of them really stand out for us as Shadow Priests.

    • Mysticism: Increases your Intellect by 5%.
    • Shadow Protection: Power infuses the target’s party and raid members, increasing their Shadow resistance for 1 hour. If the target is in your party or raid, all party and raid members will be affected.
    • Fear Ward: Wards the friendly target against Fear. The next Fear effect used against the target will fail, using up the ward. Lasts 3 min.
    • Mind Soothe: Soothes the target, reducing the range at which it will attack you by 10 yards. Only affects Humanoid and Dragonkin targets. Does not cause threat. Lasts 15 sec.
    • Mana Burn: Destroy 10% of the target’s mana (up to a maximum of 20% of your own maximum mana). For each mana destroyed in this way, the target takes 0.5 Shadow damage.
    • Holy Nova: Causes an explosion of holy light around the caster, causing 155 to 179 Holy damage to all enemy targets within X yards and healing up to 5 targets within X yards for 155 to 179. Healing is divided among the number of targets healed. These effects cause no threat.
    • Hymn of Hope: Restores 2% mana to 3 nearby low mana friendly party or raid targets every 2 sec for 8 sec, and increases their total maximum mana by 15% for 8 sec. Maximum of 12 mana restores. The Priest must channel to maintain the spell.
    • Shadowfiend: Creates a shadowy fiend to attack the target. Caster receives 3% mana when the Shadowfiend attacks. Damage taken by area of effect attacks is reduced. Lasts 15 sec.

    At level 50 every class gets a 5% buff to their primary stat for their chosen spec (Intellect for us). That bonus only applies so long as you are wearing the type of armor associated with your class, but since we can only wear Cloth we just get it by default. For us, that buff is called Mysticism. It’s not a spell, but it’s listed as such, so there you have it.

    You get two buffs in this level range to add to your buff collection. The first is Shadow Protection at 52 which gives you and your party/raid resistance to Shadow. It’s not great, but what the heck, we’ll take it. The second is Fear Ward which auto-cancels the next fear effect that targets you (or the target of your Fear Ward). Shadow Protection is an hour long buff so you want to have it up at all times just in case, but Fear Ward only last for 3 minutes and it’s only good for 1 use, so you’ll really only use it when you’re facing targets that you know are going to fear you.

    Mind Soothe is an interesting spell. It reduces the physical range that a mob will agro you at. The only time you’ll really find this useful is when you’re using gathering professions or when you’re trying to “sneak” around in a certain area where your flying mount isn’t available. It’s uses are fairly slim, but it can be helpful if you’re doing gathering professions or gathering quests and would rather not fight every mob in the area. I’ve personally never used this, but it can help if needed.

    Mana Burn is an interesting spell. It destroys mana rather than health (directly, at least) and then converts the amount of mana destroyed into half as much Shadow damage dealt to the target. It’s a decent spell to cast for running caster mobs out of mana so that they run into melee range when you’re in a dungeon, or for burning through a healer’s mana so they can’t heal anymore. I generally prefer to just kill the target, but it does have its uses.

    At level 62 we finally get our first AoE, Holy Nova. Unfortunately it’s a Holy spell so casting it takes us out of Shadowform. The damage on it kind of sucks and the healing isn’t bad but it’s not great either. I’ve gone ahead and used it a few times in LFG after getting SW:Pain and Vampiric Touch on all the mobs, then I’ll spam Holy Nova while jumping around in the group of mobs hoping for Shadowy Apparitions to proc (see talents below). It worked alright, but it wasn’t great and mobs died faster when I just stayed in Shadow and burned them down. It’s still kind of fun, though.

    Level 64 brings us one of our new mana restoration tools in the form of Hymn of Hope. It restores a total of 20% mana to up to 3 party/raid members and increases their total maximum mana by 15% for 8 sec. It’s a channeled spell, just like your Mind Flay, so if you do cast it be sure you let it do its job. The tooltip on it is a little confusing, so don’t take it at face value. By increasing the targets’ total many it increases how much mana it’s actually restoring itself as well. The best way to use this spell is to watch your healer’s mana in LFG. If you see him going down a bit, use this to give him a hand. If you’re flying solo you can use it to restore your own as well of course, but you shouldn’t be struggling with mana very often anymore.

    Level 66 introduces our summonable pet, the Shadowfiend. Every time the Shadowfiend deals damage to a target he restores 3% of your maximum mana. If you’re really hurting for mana and there’s nothing you can get it from with SW:Death casts, a good way to get some of that back is to summon your Shadowfiend and then channel Hymn of Hope while it attacks. Hymn of Hope increases your maximum mana by 20% while it’s being channeled so each of the Shadowfiend’s attacks are going to restore 3% of your temporarily increases mana pool, meaning it will restore quite a bit more mana every time it hits. If you had 10,000 mana, then each hit would restore about 300 mana. Using Hymn first increases your mana to 12,000 which would make each attack restore 360 mana instead. That might not seem like a whole lot with a 10k mana pool, but when you reach level 85 and you’ve got twelve times that much mana you’ll really start to see the benefit.

    Leveling a Shadow Priest

  • Questing Single Mob: Vampiric Touch, Mind Blast, Shadow Word:Pain, Mind Flay, Shadow Word:Death
  • This is my rotation right now for killing single targets. If the target isn’t down to 25% health by the time Mind Flay is finished being channeled, I’ll just leave them alone and go after another target, allowing SW:Pain finish them off. If they’re not elites, they’re not going to live through that.

    When you’re in Outlands you can usually leave the Mind Blast or the SW:Pain cast out of the rotation, whichever you prefer. As I move on into Northrend I’ve started to leave out the Mind Fly cast and just let the DoT’s do their thing to finish the mobs off. Until you get points spent in Shadowy Apparition, I would probably leave out the SW:Pain cast to save your mana.

  • Questing Multi-Mob: Vampiric Touch, Mind Blast, Shadow Word: Pain (first target) – Vampiric Touch, SW:Pain, Devouring Plague (second target) – Vampiric Touch, SW:Pain (all others) – SW:Death to finish targets
  • I changed this up just a little bit from the last guide. The main reason for that is because I like to get the mana regeneration from Replenishment rolling early, which requires you to Mind Blast a target currently afflicted with Vampiric Touch. I also like to make sure my Shadowy Apparitions have as many chances to proc as possible, so I get SW:Pain cast on all of the targets.

    I then switch to a second target and use all three of my DoT’s on it, adding Devouring Plague to get some heals rolling in as well. All of the other targets just get the two spammable DoT’s since Devouring Plague can only be on one target at a time. If I’m low on mana or looking to speed up the kill times then I’ll add the Shadowfiend in for some extra damage and mana regen.

    If you use a bubble before the first pull to reduce the damage you take and then start taking more damage than you can stand while PW:Shield is on cooldown, just cast Disperse and reduce your damage received by 90%. When it wears off you can use a heal if you need to, and hopefully PW:Shield is about ready to be reapplied, or Psychic Scream is off cooldown.

  • LFG Trash Rotation: Vampiric Touch (1 target), Mind Blast (same target), Shadow Word: Pain (all targets) , Mind Flay (as needed), SW:Death when possible
  • I changed this one up a bit as well, and for the same reason. I like getting that Replenishment effect rolling as soon as possible, so I do it first, then spam SW:Pain on everything.

    While I’m casting my DoT’s I generally run a crescent shape pattern back and forth behind my tank while I tab-target all of the mobs to get SW:Pain spread around. The reason for this is to increase my chance to spawn Shadowy Apparitions from 12% up to 60% per damage tick. Your apparitions can do some nice burst damage, so giving them a better chance to spawn can be pretty useful. Just don’t forget to have a Fade and/or Disperse ready to cast in case you get several Apparitions to proc and burst your way passed the tank on the threat meters.

    In Outlands I topped damage meters by doing 30-100% more DPS than everyone else in basically every instance I ran, including other players who had full, enchanted heirlooms. As I moved on to Northrend that gap quickly closed and now I often fight Mages and Warlocks for the top DPS spot. Don’t read that as me bragging, read it as an example of about where we sit as a class on DPS at this level. If you keep your DoT’s up and spread them around early then you’re going to see good results.

  • LFG Boss Rotations: Vampiric Touch, Mind Blast, Shadow Word: Pain, Devouring Plague, SW:Death, Shadowfiend (on cooldown), Mind Flay, Mind Blast, Mind Flay x2
  • Again, we’re going to get Replishment rolling first off, then we’re going to establish DoT’s. Reapply your DoT’s as needed, but remember your Mind Flay will refresh SW:Pain once you’ve spent your talent points to get the effect. Vampiric Touch (VT) will wear off before Devouring Plague (DP) will, and you’ll have enough time to cast 2-3 spells after refreshing VT before you need to refresh DP.

    Keep your DoT’s up at all times. If you need mana, get it. Shadowfiend, SW:Death, Replenishment (Vampiric Touch + Mind Blast), Dispersion, and Hymn of Hope are all sitting there just waiting to be used, so don’t let yourself run dry for no reason. If you’re especially low on mana then cast your Shadowfiend first and follow it with an immediate Hymn of Hope. Both of them restore your mana by themselves, but Hymn has the added bonus of increasing the size of your mana pool and the amount of mana returned by the Shadowfiend is based on your maximum mana, so all of its attacks will restore more thanks to Hymn.

    Talent Spec: 69 Shadow Priest

    • Mind Melt (+1) 2/2: Increases the damage done with your Shadow Word: Death by 30% on targets at or below 25% health, and when you deal damage with Mind Spike, the cast time of your next Mind Blast is reduced by 50% lasting 6 sec. Mind Melt can stack up to 2 times.
    • Pain and Suffering 2/2: Your Mind Flay has a 60% chance to refresh the duration of your Shadow Word: Pain on the target, and reduces the damage you take from your own Shadow Word: Death by 40%.
    • Paralysis 1/2: When you critically hit with your Mind Blast, you cause the target to be unable to move for 2 sec.
    • Shadowy Apparition 3/3: When you deal periodic damage with your Shadow Word: Pain, you have a 12% chance to summon a shadow version of yourself which will slowly move towards a target which is afflicted by your Shadow Word: Pain. Once reaching the target, it will instantly deal 485 shadow damage. While moving, the chance to summon the shadowy apparation is increased to 60%. You can have up to 4 Shadowy Apparitions active at a time.
    • Sin and Punishment 2/2: When your Vampiric Touch is dispelled, the dispeller and all nearby enemy targets within 10 yards have a 100% chance to be instantly feared in horror for 3 sec. When your Mind Flay critically hits, the cooldown of your Shadowfiend is reduced by 10 sec.
    • Dispersion 1/1: You disperse into pure Shadow energy, reducing all damage taken by 90%. You are unable to attack or cast spells, but you regenerate 6% mana every 1 sec for 6 sec. Dispersion can be cast while stunned, feared or silenced and clears all snare and movement impairing effects when cast, and makes you immune to them while dispersed.

    I finished off Mind Melt first because I like that extra damage on SW:Death. You find that mobs have more health when you move from Vanilla into Burning Crusade and again from Burning Crusade into Wrath, both of which you’ll do in this level bracket. By increasing the damage that you do you have a better chance of triggering that 12% mana return from your Glyph of Spirit Tap instead of only 10% mana from the Masochism talent.

    Pain and Suffering was next on my list because I like to solo all of the Outlands group quests as I come to them. Those group quests are against mobs that have way more health than anything you’ve faced before, and being able to save mana on those big fights by not having to refresh my SW:Pain spell were a big help, especially when I had to drop Shadowform to heal myself. This talent won’t help you much if you’re big on just solo questing, but it’s great on bosses in LFG as well.

    Paralysis is kind of a filler talent right now to get us down to the next level. Rooting a mob when you crit with Mind Flay is pretty cool when soloing, and really useful for PvP, but in places like LFG is most a waste. Whether or not you take this one is up to you. I have some suggestions down below for other places to spend this point.

    Shadowy Apparition is a really cool talent. When you have SW:Pain cast you have a chance to summon little shadowy versions of yourself that walk towards your target and burst into shadowy damage when they touch them. The chance to summon one is pretty low at only 12%, but that’s only when you’re standing still. If you’re moving while your SW:Pain ticks away on the target that chance is increased to 60% each time it deals damage to them. If you’re fighting mobs 1v1, then chances are good that you’re standing still, casting your spells. But if you really want to start nuking things, get your DoT’s on the target and then start moving around while your Shadow App’s blow them up.

    Sin and Punishment is a talent that you’re going to need to decide for yourself whether or not you want to take it. It has good value in PvP, but in PvE half of its effect will basically never happen. The benefit of taking it outside of PvP is that when you crit with Mind Flay you have a chance to reduce the cooldown of your Shadowfiend spell by 10 seconds, which is great if you’re still struggling with mana. I’m currently playing around with this one to decide if I like it or not for PvE, but so far it’s not too bad when doing LFG on boss fights.

    Dispersion is one of the signature Shadow Priest spells. It turns you into a shadowy cloud and reduces the damage you take by 90% for 6 seconds. During that time can’t attack or cast spells, but you do regenerate 6% of your mana every second for those 6 seconds (so 36% total mana regen). A great thing about this spell is that it can also be cast when you’re in almost any kind of CC available (I think polymorph is the only effect it won’t break). The most important thing for soloing is the mana regeneration, but the damage reduction is a great bonus as is being able to break so many forms of CC.

    If you don’t like the feel of Sin and Punishment, as part of it’s effect is very much PvP related, feel free to switch those two points around. My suggestion would be to put another point into Paralysis to root the target for 4 seconds instead of 2, and the the remaining point I would put into Psychic Horror to have a targeted fear with the added bonus of a disarm. If you don’t like either of those options, then I suggest you put the two points into Harnessed Shadows instead. The two points in Pain and Suffering can be moved as well if you don’t like the talent for leveling.

    Remember that the talents that I suggest in my leveling guides are chosen based on their usefulness in leveling your character. Some of these talents you won’t take if you’re already at end game and preparing for heroics or raids. I’ll leave that up to the people who focus on end game content.

    Glyphs
    Level 50 finally opens up our second glyph slot of each type, so we can finally start to get some more power from our glyphs without having to decide whether we’re primarily LFG levelers or solo levelers.

    Prime Glyhphs

    • Glyph of Mind Flay: Increases the damage done by your Mind Flay spell by 10% when your target is afflicted with Shadow Word: Pain.
    • Glyph of Shadow Word: Pain: Increases the periodic damage of your Shadow Word: Pain by 10%.
    • Glyph of Shadow Word: Death: If your Shadow Word: Death fails to kill the target at or below 25% health, your Shadow Word: Death’s cooldown is instantly reset. This effect cannot occur more often than once every 6 sec.
    • Glyph of Dispersion: Reduces the cooldown on Dispersion by 45 sec.

    I list the Prime Glyphs in the order that I suggest them. Mind Flay and Shadow Word: Pain are the two that I’ve been using and the two that I think I’m going to keep on using as well. Shadow Word: Death is another good option as it not only gives you a better chance of getting your Spirit Tap glyph to proc, it also gives you a way to deal some quick burst damage to mobs or bosses that are low on health. Dispersion is a decent glyph if you’re looking for more survival or more mana regen. It drops the cooldown from 2 minutes to 1 minute and 15 seconds so you can use it a lot more often, but I’m not sure that you really need to cast it that often.

    Major Glyphs

    • Glyph of Spirit Tap: When you kill a target with your Shadow Word: Death and yield experience or honor, you instantly receive 12% of your total mana over 12 sec.
    • Glyph of Fade: Reduces the cooldown of your Fade spell by 9 sec.
    • Glyph of Psychic Scream: Targets of your Psychic Scream spell now tremble in place instead of fleeing in fear, but the cooldown of Psychic Scream is increased by 3 sec.
    • Glyph of Psychic Horror: Reduces the cooldown of your Psychic Horror by 60 30 sec.

    Spirit Tap remains the top priority here, though with more mana tools coming out in this bracket you could probably drop it if you really wanted to without worrying too much. Fade is a really good option for me since I like to hit LFG now and then to help me level and it’s also good for PvP against pet classes as Fade will often make a pet leave you and target something else if you’ve not done anything to harm the pet. Psychic Scream is a good option if you’re going to do a lot of LFG leveling by making the mobs tremble in place instead of running off in random directions. Last up is Psychic Horror which cuts its cooldown in half by 30 seconds, though you’ll have to spent the talent point to get the spell in the first place before this glyph does you any good.

    Minor Glyphs

    Minor glyphs are still really minor so take whatever you want. Levitate is my first option just because I like using spells like Levitate and don’t like having to keep a supply of some stupid reagent in my bags in order to use it. Fortitude is great if you’re into LFG and just decent otherwise. Fading isn’t a bad option, though it’s not especially good either. Shadowfiend has some real good potential, but I don’t think my Shadowfiend has died from damage even once so it wouldn’t do me much good right now.

    Gearing Up Your Priest
    At this level range you should have enough of your mana returning spells and effects that Spirit isn’t quite so important now as far as mana is concerned. Spirit is still a good stat to have, especially with points in Twisted Faith turning it into Hit Rating, but at this point I wouldn’t bother stacking it above other stats that are more important to your DPS.

    Stat Priority: Intellect > Haste > Crit > Spirit

    So I’ve changed up the priority list just a little bit, dropping Spirit down a couple of notches because it’s not as important anymore. Intellect is always the top priority for DPS casters as it provides mana, spellpower, and spell crit. I have Haste ranked next because it can increase your DPS in multiple ways, but it’s especially good for classes that make use of DoT’s. I bumbed Crit up in the list mostly because of the drop in Spirit’s importance, but also because watching all of your DoT’s crit and taking a target from 85% down to 14% is a wonderful sight to see, and makes excellent SW:Death fodder for refilling your mana pool.

     
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    Posted by on February 8, 2011 in Caster, Class, Guide, Leveling, Priest

     

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    Professions Leveling: Jewelcrafting 1-525

    Continuing on with the series on Leveling Professions. This time we’re going to look at one of the hottest professions the game has to offer – Jewelcrafting.

    Jewelcrafting (or JC) is a somewhat odd profession because it completely changes what it does once you get halfway through with leveling it. Up to skill level 300 the profession crafts rings and necklaces, an occasional trinkets. Once you hit level 300 it switches your focus almost entirely over to gems with a few bits of jewelry left over. That trend continues on throughout the remaining expansions, though jewelry does crop up a bit more in Wrath and Cataclysm.

    The purpose of these guides isn’t to actually tell you what to make, because you can already find that at the same source I go to when it’s time to level professions: WoW-Professions.com. You can click on this link to find their Jewelcrafting Leveling Guide.

    Instead, I’m going to go through the leveling guide and give you the information that you don’t find at WoW-Professions. Things such as bottlenecks in crafting or materials, how I personally go about leveling them (where I deviate from their guides), and some things I like or dislike about the profession. I’ll also give a few tips on how I make gold with the profession, or ways that I might put it to use that aren’t apparent to everyone.

    Getting Started: Materials
    The first thing you need to know about Jewelcrafting is what type of materials you need to craft. Mining is your primary source. If you want to level a Jewelcrafter then you need to either make their other profession Mining so that they can provide their own mats, have another toon with Mining to feed them mats, or be prepared to spend thousands of gold on the auction house purchasing the ore or raw gems that you need.

    There are two items that you’ll need to have with you in order to perform your Jewelcrafting services. First up is the Jeweler’s Kit which you need for basically everything you do with the profession, and second is the Simple Grinder which you’ll need once you reach skill level 300 and start cutting the gems.

    Once you reach the Northrend level of Jewelcrafting you’ll also find that Alchemy can be a great benefit for leveling up your Jewelcrafting by being able to transmute certain gems for you. You don’t have to have an Alchemist, but it can be very useful. If you’re looking to do JC for the sake of profit and not simply providing gear and gems for your character then you may really want to consider leveling an Alchemist for the ability to transmute lower quality gems into higher quality.

    If you’re looking to power-level the profession you can scroll down to the bottom of this post to find a list of items you want to gather beforehand. Be aware though that there are some portions of power leveling it where there are more than one option for what items to craft and there may be a cheaper option available to you. I suggest you follow the guide as needed rather than stocking up on all the mats before hand so that you don’t end up spending thousands of gold on a certain material when you could have spent just a couple hundred on another option.

    Jeweler’s Special
    There are a couple of things that are special to the Jewelcrafting profession as well, which most other professions do not have. These are Prospecting and Daily Quests.

    Prospecting is a Jewelcrafter-only spell that you can train at skill level 20. It allows you to turn 5 of a single kind of Ore (Copper, Fel Iron, Cobalt, etc) into gems instead. The 5 Ore are destroyed in the process and replaced by the gems. Each type of ore has it’s own set of gems that it can turn into, and knowing which ore turns into which gems is the key to making gold as well as the key to leveling up “on the cheap” if you would rather farm your own ore than buy certain gems on the auction house or even worse, farm them from ore node procs alone.

    Refer to the following table to find out which kinds of gems you can get from each type of ore.

    Ore Type Primary Prospect Secondary Prospect Additional Prospects
    Copper Ore Malachite 50% Tigerseye 50% Shadowgem 10%
    Tin Ore 1-2 Lesser Moonstone 38%
    1-2 Shadowgem 38%
    1-2 Moss Agate 37% Aquamarine 3%
    Citrine 3%
    Jade 3%
    Silver Ore Cannot be prospected.
    Iron Ore 1-2 Citrine 36% 1-2 Jade 35%
    1-2 Lesser Moonstone 35%
    Aquamarine 5%
    Star Ruby 5%
    Cannot be prospected.
    Mithril Ore 1-2 Star Ruby 36% Aquamarine 35%
    1-2 Citrine 35%
    Large Opal 3%
    Azerothian Diamond 2%
    Blue Sapphire 2%
    Huge Emerald 2%
    Truesilver Ore Cannot be prospected.
    Dark Iron Ore Cannot be prospected.
    Thorium Ore 1-2 Azerothian Diamond 31%
    1-2 Blue Sapphire 31%
    1-2 Huge Emerald 31%
    1-2 Large Opal 31%
    1-2 Star Ruby N/A
    Fel Iron Ore 1-2 Uncommon Gems 17-19% Rare Gems 1.1-1.3% N/A
    Eternium Ore Cannot be prospected.
    Adamantite Ore Adamantite Powder 100% 1-2 Uncommon Gems 17-19% Rare Gems 4%
    Khorium Ore Cannot be prospected.
    Cobalt Ore 1-2 Uncommon Gems 23-24% Rare Gems 1.1-1.5% N/A
    Saronite Ore 1-2 Uncommon Gems 18-19% 1-2 Rare Gems 4-5% N/A
    Titanium Ore 1-2 Uncommon Gems 23-24% 1-2 Epic Gems 4-5% 1-2 Rare Gems 4%
    Obsidium Ore 1-2 Uncommon Gems 23-24% Rare Gems 1.2-1.3% NA
    Elementium Ore 1-2 Uncommon Gems 18% 1-2 Rare Gems 4-5% NA
    Pyrite Ore 1-3 Volatile Earth 100% Uncommon Gems 16-17% Rare Gems 7-8%

    There are a couple of other types of Ore that you can get from mining in particular zones that are used strictly for quests that I didn’t bother linking above. If there’s another type of ore you’ve found that isn’t on this list you can safely assume that it has no prospecting value.

    Trouble Areas
    Almost every profession has some sort of bottleneck, or trouble area where the mats are either hard to find or all of the recipes you have access to are either green or yellow and so only have a chance to skill you up. I’ve had yellow recipes that took up to nine attempts before it gave me a single point, and yet I’ve had green recipes that gave me a point every single time I made them. Random numbers suck, but that’s all we’ve got.

    One of the early bottlenecks you might find is pretty early on. If you can’t find 20 Small Lustrous Pearls or 40 Shadowgems (or if they’re overpriced) then you might want to take a look at the price of Silver Ore or Silver Bars instead since they can level you through the same range. I find I rarely use Silver in other professions so I end up having a couple of stacks worth sitting in my bank. You’ll see that yourself while you’re leveling through WoW-Profession’s guide, but it’s one you should be aware of for sure since the price of Shadowgems in particular can range anywhere from a few silver to several gold each.

    Now, on to some more literal bottlenecks. Large Opal is the first one that comes to mind. While you may find a few while leveling up a Miner, they aren’t all that common overall. The best way to get them is by actually prospecting Thorium Ore, which people don’t really do all that often in general. You might be able to find them on your AH if people have been prospecting ore or leveling toons with Mining, but you might find them way more expensive than you’d like to pay. If you aren’t going to spend time mining Thorium for extended periods of time then you may want to check the prices for Thorium Ore on the AH to see if it’s cheaper. You can get some of them from prospecting Mithril Ore as well, but the chance is much lower.

    You can also find Azerothian Diamonds with the same method which can ease up the cost of mats for leveling Jewelcrafting. Some of the other recipes in this level range also require other gems that can be found from prospecting Thorium. Those in particular are a bit easier to find because they also have a higher chance of being mined from the actual Thorium nodes, but it’s good to know where they come from.

    If you find that prices for the gems in this particular level range, which is 225-300 or so, then be sure to check the price of Thorium Ore to see if you might be better of buying it than the gems themselves, or give some thought into farming Thorium Ore yourself if you have a Miner who can do so easily.

    The next potential bottleneck is Outlands level gems. Typically you can find these for pretty cheap prices on the Auction House, usually less than 1g each or even just 4-5g for a stack of them. You need about 55 of them or so, and it doesn’t matter which type they are. However, you’re going to need to prospect 200 Adamantite Ore to get your hands on the 40 Adamantite Powder you need to finish leveling through Outlands content anyway, so before you purchase those gems you might want to prospect all of your Adamantite Ore and use the gems you get from it first. You do have to have a Jewelcrafting skill of 325 before you can prospect Adamantite Ore, so you may need to buy some raw gems to get you up to that point. The blue-quality rare gems from Outlands sell for 3g each to a vendor, and that’s about all they’re good for too.

    The only other bottleneck I wanted to bring up here is going to come at the very end of your JC leveling, which is the new uncommon gem, Nightstone. You need 40 of them to powerlevel, but they’re also one of the gems required for the JC daily quests so they’re often more expensive than the other gems. You can either purchase the gems themselves, or you can buy/farm the Cataclysm ores to prospect for a chance to get them. I had 24 stacks of Obsidium Ore last night and prospecting them all yielded exactly 20 of these. While prospecting is completely random in what it gives you, you can see the percentage chance of getting one is fairly low at a bit less than 1 per stack of ore in this particular example.

    Notable Special Recipes
    There are only a couple of recipes that you need to keep an eye out for when you’re leveling your Jewelcrafting. There are other options for things you can craft to get past their levels, but you’ll really spend a lot of mats using them instead.

    Both of these “special” recipes are for fairly low level crafting, and you really only need to get one or the other unless you can’t find enough of their mats to get through the level range, then it’s beneficial for you to go ahead and get both. The first one is Design: Pendant of the Agate Shield which can be purchased from Neal Allen (Alliance) in Wetlands or Jandia (Horde) in Thousand Needles.

    The second recipe is the Design: Amulet of the Moon which is purchased from Arred (Alliance) in Exodar or Mythrin’dir (Alliance) in Darnassus, or from Daniel Bartlett (Horde) in Undercity or Gelanthis (Horde) in Silvermoon City.

    While there are a lot of recipes (usually called “cuts” or “designs”) for other types of gem cuts, the way that gemming works basically nullifies all of the old cuts when new expansions are released. The only exception is twinks, but I haven’t even bothered looking into the twink gem market to be able to tell you how profitable that may or may not be.

    Specializations
    Jewelcrafting is one of the few crafting professions that does not, and has not (that I’m aware of), had any form of specializations attached to it. Basically, all JC’s are created equal.

    However, the high level gem cuts are purchased by tokens that are rewarded for completing daily quests that are only available to high level JC’s. Because of that the patterns for specific gems take time to acquire and not all JC’s will have the same patterns at the same time. Generally you’ll find that casters will start with caster cuts, melee the melee cuts, tanks the survival cuts, and so on. The exception to that, at least early on in an expansion like we are now, is when members of a guild team up in their pattern purchases so that nobody is overlapping and each JC can get a different pattern so that all of the guild’s needs can be met by at least someone, and after those needs are met then they will start to get the patterns they prefer for their own characters or that sell the best on the AH depending on what their motivations are.

    So if you’re looking for Strength gems you generally have a better shot finding the cuts you need from Jewelcrafters who are similar classes that also need those same cuts. So Strength-based Plate Tank/DPS will usually have Strength gems, Leather/Mail DPS classes will usually have Agility, DPS/Healing casters will tend towards Intellect, and so on. Like I said, it doesn’t always work that way, but in general that’s what you’ll find early on in an expansion.

    Psynister Preferences
    Jewelcrafting is one of those professions that I pretty well stick to the guides on. I do break away a few times, particularly when it comes to snatching some cheap skill ups at the beginning of each material bracket up to skill level 300.

    The item I’m talking about are the Stone Statues which each require 8 of the different types of Stone found in Azeroth mining nodes, from Rough up through Dense. The stones summon a little statue that sends out a channeled heal that targets you for a few seconds and then dies. The Rough, Coarse, and Heavy versions each take 8 of their respective stones to make and the Solid and Dense versions each take 10 of their stones. They aren’t all that useful, but they do come in handy when they’re needed and they’re fairly cheap to make as well.

    If you have a stockpile of these from leveling Mining on one of your toons then you might consider dumping them into these statues for some cheap skill levels since the stone usually sells for crap on the AH. If you don’t have your own, go ahead and check their price on the AH, and if they’re cheap go ahead and get a few stacks if you can skill up on them, but if they’re expensive then just ignore it since they’re not really needed. Making the statues does take a lot of stone, and the statues themselves only stack up to 5 so you’ll fill up your bags pretty quick, but it’s another option that can potentially save you more expensive mats.

    There are also two suggestions I’m going to make in particular regarding making gold with this profession. First off, buy every green-quality Northrend gem you find on the AH for 50 silver or less. You can cut all of the Northrend uncommon gems and vendor them for 50 silver if they’re regular cuts or 1g if they proc as a perfect cut. If they’re over 50s each then I don’t suggest you buy them, but if they’re at 50s you’ll at least break even and under 50s you’ve got guaranteed profit. The same concept applies to Cataclysm gems, except that the vendor value for them is 9g each. So if you see any at under 9g then snatch them up, cut them, and then vendor them.

    Another item you can make early on that can bring in some decent gold is the Thick Bronze Necklace. It requires level 17 to wear, provides +3 Stamina, and has a fairly low material cost of 2 Bronze Bars, 1 Shadowgem, and 1 Delicate Copper Wire. This necklace is the default choice for all level 19 twinks. Every now and then the market gets flooded with these and they aren’t worth the mats it takes to make them, but if you get your hands on some cheap mats or already have some collecting dust in your bank then it’s a good option for turning it into cash.

    Power Leveling Materials List
    The following list is taken from the WoW-Professions website. To find a list of what to make with these items you’ll need to refer to their Jewelcrafting Leveling Guide.

    Approximate Materials Required for 1-525:

    IMPORTANT! DO NOT BUY ALL OF THE MATERIALS AT ONCE! Jewelcrafting is really expensive to level, and on most servers AH is screwed up because of the insanely high prices of low level Gems, Orbs and Bars. I usually have a few tips and alternatives so you can save some gold.

    100 Copper Bar
    20 Tigerseye or 20 Malachite
    120 Bronze Bar = 60 Copper Bar, 60 Tin Bar
    60 Shadowgem OR 20 Shadowgem and 20 Small Lustrous Pearl
    80 Heavy Stone
    30 Moss Agate / 60 Lesser Moonstone for Horde
    140 Mithril Bar
    80 Solid Stone
    25 Citrine
    15 Truesilver Bar
    5 Aquamarine
    50 Thorium Bar
    10 Star Ruby
    20 Large Opal
    10 Powerful Mojo or 10 Blue Sapphire
    10 Essence of Earth or 10 Essence of Undeath
    20 Huge Emerald
    55 green gems OR 40 and 15 Black Diamond – You can find a list of green gems here. Don’t buy all of them from one kind, because there might be some recipes where you don’t have the reputation to buy it, so you will have to choose other green gems. Just buy them when you get to that part of the Jewelcrafting guide.
    40 Adamantite Powder (200 Adamantite Ore)
    10 Primal Earth
    10 Adamantite Bar
    Buy around 70 from any of the following gems: Bloodstone, Chalcedony, Dark Jade, Huge Citrine, Shadow Crystal, Sun Crystal. Make sure to buy at least 5 Bloodstone, 1 Chalcedony, 1 Shadow Crystal and 1 Dark Jade, because you will need the Bloodstones when you reach 395 and the other gems when you reach 440.
    46 Eternal Earth OR 23 Eternal Earth and 23 Eternal Shadow
    5 Forest Emerald
    5 Titanium Bar
    5 Dream Shard
    Buy 45 from any of the following gems: Carnelian, Alicite, Jasper, Zephyrite. I did not include Hessinote and Nightstone in the list, because you will use them later on.
    16 Hessinote
    40 Nightstone
    Note: 495-525 material list is not included, because you shouldn’t buy all of them at once, but you will need around 30 Shadowspirit Diamonds and a lot more Uncommon Gems for the Fire Prism transmutes.

     
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    Posted by on February 2, 2011 in Guide, Leveling, Professions

     

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