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Category Archives: Macro

Rogue Leveling Guides: 1-29 and 30-49

Bullies. Thieves. Thugs. Pirates. Ninjas.

Rogues.

One of the deadliest DPS classes in the game, the Rogue plays an often vital role in any encounter you run into. In melee range they provide some of the most useful, and most reliable crowd control and interrupt capabilities out of every class in World of Warcraft. Rogues also provide a unique solo leveling experience with a tool set and play style that can easily take your playing experience to a whole new level; if you allow it to do so.

Clicking on the images below will take you to a new site that I’m helping to contribute to called Bow Down To Us, where my Rogue Leveling guides will be hosted. The Notebook certainly isn’t going anywhere and will continue to be my primary blogging location, but from time to time I will link you to guides that I write and send over there.

The first link will take you to my Combat 1-29 leveling guide, and the second covers levels 30-49.

 
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Posted by on September 1, 2010 in Class, Guide, Leveling, Macro, Rogue

 

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Druid Leveling 30-60: Restoration and Balance



Last time we talked about Druid leveling 1-30: Resto and Balance, and today we’re going to take the next 30 levels in stride and get our little Boomchick’a’trees into Outlands. Level 30 is a big turning point for Druids, particularly Balance who have been waiting for another good spell to use for quite some time. Level 40 is similarly key for Balance Druids as Moonkin Form finally becomes available and at long last we get an AoE. Restoration doesn’t get to enjoy the butt-tentacly goodness of Tree of Life form until level 50, but they do get a few more tools added to their healing belt at levels 30 and 40.

Important Spells
The following are spells that we gain in the 30-60 level bracket that I feel have a strong impact on our playstyle either in this level bracket or throughout the Druid’s career. Numbers for healing and damage are taken from their highest spell rank within the level bracket in question (30-60), but do not reflect changes from talent points.

General (All Specs)

Track Humanoids: [Requires Cat Form] Shows the location of all nearby humanoids on the minimap. Only one type of thing can be tracked at a time.
Innervate: [Instant, 3 min cooldown] Causes the target to regenerate mana equal to 225% of the casting Druid’s base mana pool over 10 seconds.
Barkskin: The druid’s skin becomes as tough as bark. All damage taken is reduced by 20%. While protected, damaging attacks will not cause spellcasting delays. This spell is usable while stunned, frozen, incapacitated, feared or asleep. Usable in all forms. Lasts 12 seconds.
Gift of the Wild: Gives the Gift of the Wild to all party and raid members, increasing armor by 240, all attributes by 10 and all resistances by 15 for 1 hour.

You may be wondering why in the world I’m talking about a Feral ability to start with, so let me get that out for you right now. Track Humanoids is a very useful spell when you take advantage of it. It requires you to be in Cat form, but it puts icons on your mini-map of all humanoids in the area. While it’s especially great in PvP, it also has solid use while questing if you’re looking for specific humanoid mobs or a specific named mob. It’s important to note that the icon will be dull or grayed out a bit if the target is not on the same physical level as you. So if the icon isn’t bright then the mob (or player) in question may be inside a building or underground in a mine or similar structure.

Innervate is the answer to all (most) of your mana problems at long last. It restores 225% of your base mana pool (how much mana you have with no gear on), to the target over 10 seconds. When I first got this spell and was healing all the time I used this on the DPS people I ran with in LFG. As I switched to Boomkin and as I got higher in level I came to use it in both specs. As a boomkin you’ll be using this from the day you get it to the day you retire the character. As a tree, you’ll use it pretty often from your high-40s to your mid-70s, and then its usage will slacken again as you get in groups that are better geared and you get better gear yourself.

Barkskin is your panic button as a Tree, and your “die now, suckas!” button as a Boomkin. If you’re healing and you start taking hits then this is how you save yourself and your spellcasts so that you can keep people alive while you wait for someone to taunt him off of you (unlike the freaking paladin who let four casters send frostbolts and shadowbolts at my face repeatedly). As a Boomkin it still holds the same use, but it can also be put to an offensive use because it removes the pushback you suffer while casting. That includes pushback of your channeled spells, so your Hurricane AoE will get its full effect.

Druid Forms
Moonkin Form: Shapeshift into Moonkin Form. While in this form the armor contribution from items is increased by 370%, damage taken while stunned is reduced by 15%, and all party and raid members within 100 yards have their spell critical strike chance increased by 5%. Single target spell critical strikes in this form have a chance to instantly regenerate 2% of your total mana. Moonkins can not cast healing or resurrection spells while shapeshifted. The act of shapeshifting frees the caster of Polymorph and Movement Impairing effects.

Tree of Life Form: Reduces the mana cost of your healing over time spells by 20% and grants the ability to shapeshift into the Tree of Life. While in this form you increase healing received by 6% for all party and raid members within 100 yards, and you can only cast Restoration spells in addition to Innervate, Barkskin, Nature’s Grasp and Thorns spells. The act of shapeshifting frees the caster of Polymorph and Movement Impairing effects.

Flight Form: Shapeshift into flight form, increasing movement speed by 150% and allowing you to fly. Cannot be used in combat. Can only use this form in Outland and Northrend. The act of shapeshifting frees the caster of Polymorph and Movement Impairing effects.

The last of our combat forms (except Dire Bear Form which we get for free at level 40 and is an upgraded version of Bear Form), these are the two forms that you’ll spend most of your time in from here on out. That won’t be the case for Tree Druids once Cataclysm gets here, but for now that’s how it is.

Moonkin is your caster DPS form and what you’ll be in basically non-stop unless you’re traveling or find yourself in need of some emergency healing. The +5% Crit buff is great for being in groups or raids, and you have the added benefit of having some of your mana restored when you crit while in Moonkin Form as well, so it’s even better.

Tree of Life Form is your healing form and you definitely don’t want to break it if you don’t have to. WIth -20% mana cost on your primary heals and an extra 6% healing done you definitely don’t want to pass up those benefits if you don’t have to. The only time I find myself popping out of Tree Form is when I decide to add some DPS to the mix because everyone’s at full health and I’m at full mana and passing out from boredom, or when I’m doing PvP and need to use other spells that break the form such as Entangling Roots.

Flight Form is one of the best spells ever given to us. I always thought this spell was cool, but I didn’t realize just how amazing it really is until I got it for myself. Not only is it great for travel, it’s also unmatched for gathering professions and gathering quests as well. Of the three gathering professions, only Mining breaks you out of your flight forms, but the fact that it’s instant cast means you’re still a step ahead of any other class that’s out there farming mats with the possible exception of Paladins and Death Knights with their +20% movement spells and talents. And on top of that it’s just plain fun to use.

Restoration Spells
Resto doesn’t get any new spells by default of leveling in this range, but they do get some new spells through their talent tree. Because of that though, I’ll cover them in the talents section instead of general spells.

Balance Spells
Hurricane: [Instant, Channeled] Creates a violent storm in the target area causing 100 Nature damage to enemies every 1 second and reducing movement speed and increasing time between attacks of the enemies by 20%. Lasts 10 seconds and the Druid must channel to maintain the spell.

At long last, level 40 comes with our first AoE spell, and lucky for us it’s a good one. The good news is, it hits hard and fast and also slows everything it hits. The bad news is, you’ll be tearing through your mana pool like I will a plate full of bbq ribs, and in case you’ve never had the (dis)pleasure of seeing me eat ribs, let me tell you that’s fast. When you first get it, even with +Int enchants on your gear, you’ll be lucky to get three of these cast before you’re completely out of mana.

Leveling as Balance
Questing Rotation: Starfire, Wrath, Moonfire, Insect Swarm, (Wrath spam or Entangling Roots)
LFG Trash Rotation: Insect Swarm*, Hurricane**, Typhoon, Wrath for clean-up
LFG Boss Rotation: Faerie Fire, Wrath, Insect Swarm, Moonfire, Wrath/Starfire spam

The questing rotation is pretty much all you’ll need until Northrend. In vanilla content I preferred to just burn things, so I would spam Wrath to finish off the mobs and not really let my DoTs do their full damage. It’s not like I was a Warlock, right? I also ran out of mana like nobody’s business. I didn’t really catch on until Outlands when I sat down and really looked at what my spells did. It was then that I found out the trick to conserving my mana, and that was to let my DoTs do their job, or to not cast them in the first place. Look at the damage that your spells do and look at the health of the mobs you’re facing. If you can kill everything with Starfire (or Wrath) > Moonfire > Insect Swarm > Entangling Roots, then do it. Knock them down a few notches with your nukes, then DoT them up and let them die while you go pull another mob.

As we sit right now, pre-Cataclysm, LFG dungeons are all about AoE on trash mobs. If there’s a caster or a heavy damaging melee mob in the mix then throw an Insect Swarm* on them at the beginning, if there’s not then don’t bother casting it unless you really want to. Cast Hurricane** once and then judge the health of the mobs. If there aren’t at least three mobs alive and with more than 25% health or so then don’t cast it again, otherwise give it a second cast. If the mobs are near death, but there are multiples, then Hurricane is going to be a waste of your mana, so instead use your Typhoon (if you have it) to take them out or clean up any remaining mobs with Wrath or your questing rotation if they have a lot of health.

For boss fights you want to maximize your own DPS and that of the group. Faerie Fire reduces the target’s armor so that your melee deal more damage to them, and with the Improved Faerie Fire talent you also make them easier for you to hit with your spells and easier for you to crit with your spells as well. The Wrath right after that is to establish your Earth and Moon debuff which increases the spell damage they take by 13%. So establish your debuffs on the boss, cast your DoT spells, and then lay into him with nukes. Casting FF/Wr/IS/Mf at the beginning should give your tank time to build enough threat that your double-Starfire will not steal agro from him (unless they both crit), but just in case it does you’ll want to either back off on your DPS or cut out your second Starfire for Wraths instead.

[Update: I forgot cooldowns!
Once you get high enough that you have Eclipse 3/3 you'll chance up your nukes and instead cast Wrath until you get a Lunar Eclipse proc, then cast Starfire until Solar Eclipse procs, recast your DoT's, and then go back to Wrath/Starfire to use your Eclipse procs.

You also don't want to forget to use your cooldowns, so once you have Force of Nature you want to cast it right before you start in on the Wrath spam. Starfall should come after the Force of Nature, but I would save that for boss fights instead of trash packs to avoid over pulling and accidental wipes.]

Leveling as Resto
Questing Rotation: Starfire, Moonfire, Entangling Roots, Starfire, Entangling Roots, Wrath, Wrath
LFG Healing Priority: Regrowth, Rejuvenation, Swiftmend, Nature’s Swiftness + Healing Touch

Questing as Resto still sucks, and in fact it sucks even more as we gain more levels. You shouldn’t have much trouble until your 50’s, but it gets worse as you go. You’re basically a Root & Nuke machine with Wrath Spam. When things get a little rough you may want to use Bear/Cat form to save yourself a little mana. I did a little bit of questing as Resto in Outlands just to try it out and the best thing I found was to actually start off the fights in Cat form and use all of my energy before switching back to caster form for R&N.

With Innervate at our disposal now I tend to be a bit more nuke-heavy in my R&N rotations after level 40. I prefer to use Starfire to break the roots instead of Wrath and only use Wrath to finish them off. As you get more spell power on your gear you’re going to break the roots with either Starfire or Wrath, so you might as well get a little extra damage from roots ticks while going for the big Starfire cast than Wrath, but it’s up to you.

If you quest as Resto then use whichever style works best for you. Personally, I just picked up a dual spec and switched between DPS and Heals as needed. If you don’t have 1,000g laying around to do that though, you’ll need to either deal with questing as a healer or leveling strictly through LFG and PvP Battlegrounds.

Resto Spec and Glyphs




Changes: First off I’m going to let you know we’ve got some changes to the spec here. The spec I used leveling up to 30 worked great for me. As I got higher in level though, some of those points we spent early on became wasted and talents that we didn’t buy with those points became needed. If you’ve followed this spec beyond level 15 then you can either respec now or wait until level 40. The problem talent is Naturalist, which reduces the cast time of Healing Touch. Once we get Nature’s Swiftness at level 30 that talent becomes mostly useless because the only time we’ll cast Healing Touch from here on is when we use Nature’s Swiftness to remove its cast time all together. Instead you should invest those points into Natural Shapeshifter. This should be the new link: Level 30 Resto

Gift of Nature 5/5: Increases the effect of all healing spells by 10%.
Improved Rejuvenation 3/3: Increases the effect of your Rejuvenation spell by 15%.
Nature’s Bounty 1/5: Increases the critical effect chance of your Regrowth and Nourish spells by 5%.
Swiftmend 1/1: [Instant cast, 15 second cooldown] Consumes a Rejuvenation or Regrowth effect on a friendly target to instantly heal them an amount equal to 12 seconds of Rejuvenation or 18 seconds of Regrowth.
Living Spirit 3/3: Increases your total Spirit by 15%.
Nature’s Bounth +1 (2/5): Increases the critical effect chance of your Regrowth and Nourish spells by 10%.
Empowered Rejuvenation 5/5: The bonus healing effects of your healing over time spells is increased by 20%.
Tree of Life 1/1: Reduces the mana cost of your HoT spells by 20% and grants Tree form. While in Tree form you increase healing received by 8% for all party and raid members w/i 100 yards, and you can only cast Restoration spells in addition to Innervate, Barkskin, Nature’s Grasp and Thorns spells.
Improved Tree of Life 3/3: Increases your armor contribution from items while in Tree form by 200%, and increases your healing spell power by 15% of your spirit while in Tree form.
Revitalize 1/3: Your Rejuvenation and Wild Growth spells have a 5% chance to restore 8 Energy, 4 Rage, 1% Mana or 16 Runic Power per tick.
Gift of the Earthmother 5/5: Increases your total spell haste by 10% and reduces the base cooldown of your Lifebloom spell by 10%.
Wild Growth 1/1: [Instant cast, 6 second cooldown] Heals up to 5 friendly party or raid members within 15 yards of the target for 686 over 7 seconds. The amount healed is applied quickly at first, and slows down as the WG reaches its full duration.

Resto Glyphs

Major

  • Glyph of Regrowth: Increases the healing ofyour Regrowth spell by 20% if your regrowth effect is still active on the target.
  • Glyph of Swiftmend: Your Swiftmend ability no longer consumes a Rejuv. or Regrowth effect from the target.
  • Glyph of Innervate: Innervate now grants the caster 45% of their base mana pool over 10 seconds in addition to the normal effects of Innervate.

I made a slight change to the glyphs as well once I found out how Nature’s Grasp and Swiftmend work. I never cast Healing Touch without Nature’s Grasp to make it instant anymore, so the Glyph of Healing Touch has been removed. I also found that I rarely needed to Rebirth somebody in combat while leveling until I got to Northrend, and even then it’s no problem to bring them back with a regular battle res and then just heal them to full with a couple of casts, so that glyph is gone as well (though it will reappear in the level 80 build).

As such, go ahead and keep Regrowth for now as your level 15 glyph, use whatever you want as filler at level 30, and then at level 40 swap that one out for Swiftmend.

If you find yourself having mana problems, which I did once I started getting BRD for all of my randoms, you may want to drop Regrowth for Innervate instead for the extra mana. It’s not necessary, but it is useful if you find yourself in need of mana frequently and your group doesn’t like sitting still for you to drink.

Minor

I used to think Unburdened Rebirth just saved me bag space, but I had no idea that the reagent for Rebirth actually changes every time you get a new rank of the spell. I keep a full stack of reagents on hand when I don’t have a glyph to remove them, but having to constantly go to a vendor to buy the new type of reagent or downrank the spell to use an old one was ridiculous on so many levels it’s not even funny. Get this glyph of your Druids no matter which spec you’re running.

Though my love for Aquatic Form runs deep, I do need to point you to useful glyphs when I can so for the sake of being helpful I’m going to suggest the Wild over it for leveling purposes. You should be buffing people in dungeons and battlegrounds and you’re going to need to rebuff yourself every half hour as well, so it only makes sense that we cut the mana cost of that in half.

Balance Spec and Glyphs




Lunar Guidance 3/3: Increases your spell power by 12% of your total Intellect.
Improved Insect Swarm* 1/3: Increases your damage done by your Wrath spell to targets afflicted by your Insect Swarm by 1%, and increases the critical strike chance of your Starfire spell by 1% on targets afflicted by your Moonfire spell.
Moonfury 3/3: Increases the damage done by your Starfire, Moonfire and Wrath spells by 10%.
Dreamstate 2/3: Regenerate mana equal to 7% of your Intellect every 5 seconds, even while casting.
Moonkin Form: Shapeshift into Moonkin form, increasing armor from items by 370%, damage taken while stunned reduced by 15%, and party/raid members w/i 100 yards gain 5% critical strike chance. Your critical spell strikes have a chance to instantly regenerate 2% of your total mana.
Improved Moonkin Form: Your Moonkin Aura also causes targets to gain 3% haste and you gain 30% of your Spirit as additional spell damage.
Improved Faerie Fire 1/3: Your FF spell also increases the chanace the target will be hit by spell attacks by 1%, and increases the critical strike chance of your damage spells by 1% on targets afflicted by FF.
Owlkin Frenzy 3/3: Attacks done to you while in Moonkin form have a 15% chance to cause you to go into a Frenzy, increases your damage by 10%, causing you to be immune to pushback while casting Balance spells and restores 2% base mana every 2 seconds. Lasts 10 seconds.
Wrath of Cenarius 2/5: Your Starfire spell gains an additional 8% and your Wrath gains an additional 4% of your bonus damage effects.
Typhoon 1/1: [Instant cast] Summon a violent Typhoon that does 400 Nature damage to enemies, knocking them back and dazing them for 6 seconds.
Force of Nature 1/1: [Instant cast, 3 minute cooldown] Summons 3 treants to attack enemy targets for 30 seconds.
Eclipse 3/3: When you critically hit with Starfire, you have a 100% chance of increasing damage done by Wrath by 40%. When you crit with Wrath, you have a 60% chance of increasing your critical strike chance with Starfire by 40%. Effect lasts 15 seconds and each has a separate 30 seconds cooldown. Both effects cannot occur simultaneously.
Earth and Moon 3/3: Your Wrath and Starfire spells hav a 100% chance to apply the Earth and Moon effect, which increases spell damage taken by 13% for 12 seconds. Also increases your spell damage by 6%.
Gale Winds 2/2: Increases damage done by your Hurricane and Typhoon spells by 30%, and increases the range of your Cyclone spell by 4 yards.
Starfall 1/1: [Instant cast, 90 seconds cooldown] You summon a flurry of stars from the sky on all targets within 30 yards, each dealing 145 to 167 Arcane damage. Also causes 26 Arcane damage to all other enemies within 5 yards of the enemy target. Maximum 20 stars. Lasts 10 seconds. Shapeshifting into an animal form or mounting cancels the effect. Any effect which causes you to lose control of your character will suppress the starfall effect.

That’s a pretty big list of talents, so I’m not going to go into detail about what they do or why we’re taking them because it should be fairly obvious from the descriptions I list after them. Basically we’re taking talents that increase the damage of our primary spells (Wrath, Starfire, Moonfire, Insect Swarm), we’re trying to either conserve or regenerate mana wherever we can, we’re increasing spell power based on other stats (Intellect or Spirit), and we’re gaining other spells that help to increase our DPS as well (Typhoon, Force of Nature, Starfall).

If you read through the talents you’ll also get the sense of what really drives a Moonkin’s playstyle, and that’s Crit. The more you crit, the more benefits you get from various talents and spells. You get mana back, you get increased damage on Wrath or increased crit chance on Starfall, and so on. Moonkins go by a lot of names, but this is why “Critchicken” is one of them.

Balance Glyphs

Major

  • Glyph of Innervate: Innervate now grants the caster 45% of their base mana pool over 10 seconds in addition to the normal effects of Innervate.
  • Glyph of Focus: Increases the damage done by Starfall by 10%, but decreases its radius by 50%.
  • Glyph of Wrath: Reduces the pushback suffered from damaging attacks while casting your Wrath spell by 50%.

We’re taking a pretty big turn in the glyph world from where we were before, mainly because of the new spells that become available to us as we level. When you get to level 40 you want to replace one of your glyphs with Innervate. If you’re doing a lot of soloing then drop Insect Swarm for it. If you’re running dungeons or doing a lot of PvP, then drop Wrath for it instead. With this glyph using Innervate on yourself now restores 270% of your base mana pool to you and if you use it on someone else then you still get 45% of yours returned as well. While I have cast it on other people on occasion, most often I end up using it on myself, so the extra mana just keeps me going that much longer.

Once you hit level 60 and get the glorious Starfall spell it’s time to grab Focus which you’ll swap out for the Wrath/IS glyph that you’re still holding onto. Starfall is an amazing, face own spell of mass destruction. The problem is, it’s mass destruction is freaking massive, having a total reach of up to 35 yards (30 plus 5 yard splash). That’s a lot of damage to a lot of mobs, but the problem is the range on it. Using Starfall basically pulls every mob in your area to you. Using it in dungeons is like asking the mobs to come wipe your group. Focus cuts the radius in half which helps with the wiping, and it also increases its damage by 10%. You still have to watch out for those wipes, but at least now you’re as likely to get everyone killed when you use it.

Minor

While I’m still a big fan of the Aquatic Form glyph, I’m going to have to throw some other suggestions out there for those of you who aren’t. I still don’t cast Rebirth a lot as DPS, though I know I will do it more when I start raiding with him, but it’s still better to have this glyph on hand to remove the reagent. I didn’t realize until leveling the druid more that the reagent for Rebirth changes every time it gets a new rank. So not only do you have to have the reagent, you also have to keep buying new ones all the time when it levels. Save yourself the hassle and just get the glyph. Typhoon is a good glyph to pick up if you’re doing a lot of random dungeons. In PvP and solo questing I love the pushback effect so I don’t use the glyph myself, but it does get the tanks a little upset sometimes.

I personally level with Aquatic Form and Unburdened Rebirth, but Typhoon is a good choice over Aquatic Form if you don’t care for a little extra swim speed with how little it’s actually necessary to swim.

Gearing Your Druid

Resto: Spell Power > Haste > Spirit
Balance: Spell Power > Crit > Intellect > Spirit

Since we’re still leveling I’m going to keep Intellect pretty high on the list. Resto usually has no mana problems starting out, then can’t seem to get enough mana around level 40 and through most of Outlands, and then you get into Northrend and you’re flooded with mana again. If you have mana problems then stack more Int. If you don’t have mana problems then stack more Spell Power. Alternatively you can stack more Spell Power regardless of your mana issues and try to get your heals large enough that you don’t worry about mana because you need fewer heals anyway.

Balance always has mana problems, that’s just the way it is. Personally, I like to fix that by kicking the crap out of things fast enough that it doesn’t matter, or with so few spells that it’s not a problem. Rather than stacking Intellect so that we can cast 10 spells to finish off a mob, go ahead and stack Spell Power as much as you can so that your spells do enough damage that just a few casts can kill them. Your spells make themselves better when you Crit because of your talent points in things such as Eclipse, so crit has a solid place for us now as well. Haste is the key to having your Starfire not take forever to cast, and as one of your hardest hitting spells you’ll ever have that’s a big deal as well. When none of that is available, then it’s time to get some Intellect, and if you can’t find it then pick up Spirit which translates into mana regen as well as Spell Power when you’re in Moonkin form.

 
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Posted by on July 2, 2010 in Caster, Class, Druid, Guide, Leveling, Macro, Play Styles

 

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Play Styles: Death Knights for Healers

[Update: For the sake of clarification and maintaining my reputation as both being sane and having some common sense, I want to point out that this post was my on-the-fly shot at an April Fools post. There are some elements of truth in it, at least as far as being able to DPS via TargetOfTarget Macros in conjunction with Grid/Clique, but I made no honest effort in really trying to tell you how to do it. I'm hoping that was all pretty obvious, but just in case this is looked at in the future and its date isn't noticed, there you have it.]

Last week we covered Play Styles: Death Knights for Spellcasters, so this week we’re going to cover DK’s for Healers. Granted, a healer is a spellcaster too, but they don’t cast spells the way the rest of us do, instead they use fancy little addons. We’re going to talk about two of those fancy little addons today: Grid and Clique.

Necessary Disclaimer
If you’re playing the class to maximize your DPS then you have to embrace the melee aspect of the class, that’s all there is to it. But if you’re not comfortable with melee and need to stay more caster-like in the method of playing the class, then this is the setup you want to go with. It’s not about maximizing your DPS potential, it’s about maximizing your own potential with your given skill set (and addon familiarity, of course).

Outlining Your Spec
Similar to the Spellcaster Playstyle, we need to rely heavily on spells. We’re also going to try to keep you at range so that you can remain safely tucked away in your comfort zone rather that up in the thick of melee combat. Now, I know you’re all wondering why in the world I’m throwing you into a Frost spec, right? I mean, come on now, we all know that Blood is meant to be the real healer, right? You’re just going to have to trust me when I tell you that playing the DK with any play style other than melee you’re going to want to be Frost. Used to caster dps? Screw Unholy’s magical damage, Frost has the playstyle. Used to being a healer? Screw Blood’s healing potention, Frost has the playstyle. Got it? Good.

HEALER-LIKE FROST KNIGHTS




We’re going to skip the detailed talent descriptions again this time because what I’m about to show you will save you the trouble of having to remember what all of this stuff does, because we’re going to tie it all into those addons so that you’ll just have to remember what happens when you use the various mouse click combinations.

Last time I broke the spec down into level 60, 70, and 80. But everyone knows a you don’t level as heals, you just respec at 80. So that’s what we’re doing here too. Just level as Unholy DPS, faceroll everything you see, and then jump to this spec at 80. Now, you may be asking yourself how in the world that’s supposed to work since the whole purpose of this article is to teach you how to level as a DK when you’re used to playing a healer. The answer to that question is simple. Step 1: Roll a DK. Step 2: Get out of the starting zone. Step 4: Respec at level 80. It seems like I might be forgetting something in there, but I can’t think of what it is. If I remember it I’ll let you know.

Moving right along then.

Level 80 Spec
We’re actually going to be emulating a Frost DPS spec this time more so than a Frost tank, because we need some of those other abilities to keep up with the style we’re used to. We don’t bother with any of the survivability crap because we know the tank always has our back when it comes to threat, right? Some of our spec will be the same as the Spellcaster Style with things such as Runic Power Mastery to increase our maximum Runic Power supply, and Merciless Combat which increases our damage to targets with low health. As a healer you’re used to focusing your heals on the people with low health, so to apply that to being DPS we’re going to help you focus on the ones that are close to dying so that you can kill them faster. See the similarities there? You’ll have this down in no time.

Every good healer has some means of raid healing, and we’re bringing that concept into our DPS spec by using “raid killing” instead via Howling Blast which is our big AoE spell, Deathchill which makes our hardest hitting spells instant-crits, and Killing Machine which can proc for the same effect as Deathchill. So we’ve got some serious heal kill power ready to be unleashed at a moment’s notice.

Every healer needs a nice little agro dump too, so we’re picking up Hungering Cold which will freeze everything in place and give you time to either bandage yourself if needed, allow your Runes to cool down in case you were otherwise defenseless, or to just go hide behind the tank and his AoE threat so that he can pull those mean little mobs off of you. It won’t dump our agro, but it’s the best we’ve got so deal with it. If you’re really used to using agro dumps though, you probably want to roll a Night Elf so that you can Shadowmeld whenever things get hairy.

Since you’re here from the healer’s perspective instead of the DPS caster, I’m going to keep you in your comfort zone and instead of dipping into Unholy for extra magic business, we’re going into Blood for extra healing tools. Most notably we’re taking Rune Tap so that we can heal ourselves for 10% of our max health instantly and Improved Rune Tap which not only doubles the heal from Rune Tap to 20% of our max health, but also cuts its cooldown in half so that we can pop that baby every 30 seconds. If that’s not juicy heals, I don’t know what is.

But that’s not all! We’re also going to pick up Vendetta so that we also heal 2% of our max HP anytime we kill something worth killing. We’re going to be slaying so many things that even with only 2% of our health getting healed it will be like we have three Resto Druids hanging out in our bag space throwing HoTs on us all day long. I mean, the amount of healing we’re packing here is just plain sick, I tell you.

Caster Knight Glyphs

Major Glyphs
Glyph of Rune Tap: Your Rune Tap heals yourself for an additional 10% of the effect, and also heals your party for 10% of their maximum health.
Glyph of Disease: Your Pestilence ability now refreshes disease durations on your primary target back to their maximum duration.
Glyph of Howling Blast: Your Howling Blast ability now infects your targets with Frost Fever.

First thing’s first, we have to stick to our roots and be able to throw at least some amount of healing around on the raid instead of just ourselves. For that you want to grab the Rune Tap glyph first so that you’re able to throw out 10% health to the whole party with a single click of a button. It also gives us another 10%, but that’s 10% of our current 20%, giving us a total of 22% of our max health, not 30%.

Glyph of Disease refreshes all of our disease DoTs on all targets, which is sort of like refreshing all of our HoTs. DPS isn’t all that different from healing when you look at it that way. You’re used to refreshing HoTs, so now you just have to practice refreshing your DoTs. And this glyph even allows you refresh them on all of your targets at the same time. Don’t you wish your Resto Druid could do that?

And Howling Blast applies our main DoT to all the enemies it hits, so it’s sort of the equivalent of Tranquility, but without having to channel it.

Minor Glyphs
Glyph of Pestilence: Increases the radius of your Pestilence effect by 5 yards.
Glyph of Raise Dead: Your Raise Dead spell no longer requires a reagent.
Glyph of Blood Tap: Your Blood Tap no longer causes damage to you.

The Glyph of Pestilence is going to give you the most initial benefit by allowing you to spread your diseases around in a larger area. Next up is the Glyph of Raise Dead which allows us to summon our Ghoul without a reagent and without the required type of corpse lying around. You can use your Ghoul to increase your DPS, draw some aggro off of you, or to sacrifice to your Death Pact ability you get at level 66 to instantly heal 40% of your maximum health. That’s almost like having a Lay On Hands for yourself (beautiful). Last on the list is the Glyph of Blood Tap to remove the damage that the spell does to us. Ever had to heal a Warlock that was click-happy with his Life Tap? If so then you know how much you’re going to piss off your healer if you keep damaging yourself. We’re just taking this glyph as a matter of principle so that we can keep our healers happy.

How To: Healer-Style Death Knight

So in case you haven’t caught on yet, your role model is the Resto Druid. Druids roll the HoTs, and we roll the DoTs.

Healer-like Damaging Spells
Here we’ll talk about all of the DPS spells you’re going to cast, and we’ll explain it in terms that a good tree will understand.

Single Target Tree Nukes

Icy Touch always gets the first slot for us because that’s what you’ll start most of your fights off with. Icy Touch is a ranged Frost attack, and to relate that to being a tree we’re going to pretend that it’s the dead of winter up in Ice Crown (when is it not winter, right?), and your limbs are all frosted over. When the weight gets to be too much one of your limbs snaps off and falls to the ground with a big crash. That’s what we’re doing here, we’re going to freeze one of our own limbs, and fling at a mob’s face. The resounding crash is what it’s all about here.



Death Coil is our next single target nuke. It doesn’t provide us with a disease on the target, but it stings real good. And speaking of stinging, that’s how we’ll describe it. When you cast this you’re going to shake that little bee hive that’s hanging on your lower branches to stir up your little friends and then send them after the mobs with stingers exposed.



AoE Tree Nukes

Howling Blast is our first AoE damaging spell. HB is sort of like shaking yourself after a good rain, sort of like a dog does when it’s wet. You find a target and then shake your wet little leaves and the freezing water flies out at the target and all the enemies around them, splashing them with your water.



Blood Boil is our next largest AoE spell, costing only a single Blood Rune. When you cast BB, it’s like you’re calling on your earthy little friends, the Fire Ants. You give them a shout and they crawl out of the ground and bite the holy ever loving crap out of everything around you. If the targets are diseased then it burns even more. Fire Ants are to mobs what termites are to you. Got it? Good.



Death and Decay is the signature AoE spell of the Death Knights, but it’s getting the last slot for actually AoE nuke spells because of how it works and how much it costs. Death and Decay has to be cast on a certain area on the scree, so you can’t use our fancy Grid and Clique setup to cast it. Instead you have to actually click somewhere else on the screen, which is annoying. As such, it’s sort of like sinking your root-feet into the ground and causing them to spring up all around you as tenticly-root appendages of freaky, ouchy doom. Those roots will jump out and rub all the mobs the wrong way while they stay within the area.



Macros
Here are the macros you’re going to need to make all of this work.

#showtooltip
/s Watch out everybody, I’m a’shaking mah leaves!
/cast [target=targettarget] Howling Blast
/startattack

#showtooltip
/s Hey, my Aunt’s ants are here! I bet they’ll help us out!
/cast Blood Boil
/startattack

#showtooltip
/s Tree limb, flying past your face!
/cast [target=targettarget] Icy Touch
/startattack

#showtooltip
/s These bees! They be a’buzzing!
/cast [target=targettarget] Death Coil
/startattack

Setting Up Grid and Clique
In order to make all of this work you’re going to have to setup your addons to activate those macros. If you’re not using G&C right now, then WHAT THE CRAP KIND OF HEALER ARE YOU!?!?!

Sorry. If you don’t already use Grid and Clique then here are some links to help you learn how it’s done:
Defenders of the Crown, PDF version
The Holy Priest Blog
Comparing Raid Frame Heavyweights
One Handed Healing

Not all of your spells are going to be able to be tied into the same kind of macros, so you’ll need to either make some others or just use the spells normally. Rune Tap, for instance, needs to be easily accessed so that you can actually heal yourself and your party, so be sure to put that on your action bars or add it to the addons as well so that you can activate it by clicking in your own unit frame.

It wouldn’t hurt to include your melee attacks, such as Plague Strike and Death Strike to your bars as well, just in case you do find yourself mixed up in melee, but you can always just run away like a little girl or bet your tank to pull them off of you.

Wrap Up
Now, just take all of those macros that I gave you up there and tie them into Clique. You can then use Grid, in conjunction with Clique, to activate all of the macros and attack whoever’s target you want to attack. You don’t need to bother picking your targets or worrying about hitting the wrong one, just spam clicks on your Tank’s unit frame and you’ll always be casting on whoever his target is. If he can’t hold agro on a single target against your spells, then he’s got his own problems to worry about.

Hopefully you find these jewels of wisdom to be useful to you and with any luck you can keep your same old healer interface and still have everything run perfectly smooth for you.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on April 1, 2010 in Caster, Class, Death Knight, Guide, Macro, Melee, Play Styles

 

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Macro: Linking Both Professions

After quite a bit of searching, I finally found a macro that will allow you to link two trade skills at once.

Since I receive hits on my blog almost every day concerning this very thing, I figured it would probably be a good idea to share it with you. So here you have it, a macro that will post both of your Professions into chat with a single click, and from a single macro.

/script SendChatMessage(select(2,GetSpellLink(“Tailoring“))..select(2,GetSpellLink(“Enchanting“)),”CHANNEL”,nil,GetChannelName(“Trade – City”));

Just change the two professions I have underlined up there to whatever your own professions happen to be, and away you go.

UPDATE: When you copy this macro you also need to replace the quotation marks as well as the dash in “Trade – City”. I assume that the problem is caused by the font used in the blog, but I cannot say for sure. Just delete the quotes and dash and then type them back in and it will work.

Copy & Paste
Prof_Macro_Error

Copy & Paste after replacing quotes/dash
Prof_Macro_Fix

 
6 Comments

Posted by on July 24, 2009 in Macro, Professions

 

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(Mar 30) Macros 101

Alright, I have been promising an article on World of Warcraft macros for a while now, so I am going to take the short amount of time I have available to me today during my break time to talk about the basics.
 
Macros can be used for a wide variety of things ranging from ability usage, to profession advertising, to chat announcements, and tracking mats that you are farming. Macros does not technically have to refer to a macro though as scripts are also handled in the same screen and via the same methods. There are differences between the two, but those can wait for later. In this particular article I am not going to cover the ability and spellcasting macros as they are much more involved and will take more time than I have.
 
Accessing Macros
If you are going to work with macros, then you probably need to know where you can find them. The simplest method is to open up your options menu in the game by hitting the ESC key and then clicking on the button that says “Macros”. I am a fan of using the keyboard more so than the mouse, so I used to access the menu by typing /macro into the chat window and then pressing enter. Either method works and you can use whatever method works best for you.
 
<aside>
Being the macro junky that I am, I actually have a macro that does nothing more than /macro and then I bind that onto my right action bar so that I can access them with a single click. It only saves me a single click or a half-second of typing, but since I use it all the time it all adds up in the end.
</aside>
 
Names and Icons
Each macro can have a single name and a single icon associated with it. One partial exception to this rule is the very first icon in the list that looks like a red question mark. This particular icon is able to change and look like any other icon in the game based off of what you have the macro doing. The details of that are a little more advanced, so I will save most of it for later. For now though, lets just say that I use the question mark icon for everything except for chat macros.
 
Chat Macros
Chat macros are the second-most commonly asked about macros that I see, following closely behind ability macros which I will get into momentarily. Chat macros are usually used for things that you say frequently that could potentially be viewed as spam, or it could be used for alerts and warnings to your party or raid. They use the same general rules as regular chat options in the game such as /g for guild chat, /r for replies, /2 for trade chat, /p for party chat, and so on.
 
One of the macros that initially caused a surge in people asking about macros was a congratulatory macro we used for congratulating people in guild chat for things they accomplished, whether it be a ding (gaining a level), an achievement, or finding a good piece of gear they were looking for. They come in all shapes and sizes and I do not have a copy now of the one that we originally used, but it was set up to make a picture out of letters, numbers, and symbols. To give you some example of what a G-Grats macro might look like:
 
/g **************************
/g **                      **
/g **  CONGRATULATIONS!!!  **
/g **                      **
/g **************************
 
Using this macro would cause everything above (except for the “/g”) to be printed in your guild chat. Since the macro would issue all of the individual commands to speak that macro at once, they would all appear together where if you tried to type them individually you may have someone else type a message that might interfere with your pretty little portrait there. Now, if you use something like this all the time, it may get annoying to your guild mates, but every guild is different so just follow the rules of your guild.
 
Here is another example of a macro that I use on occasion, though as you will see, it does not get used very frequently:
 
/y Happy Birthday to you! Happy Birthday to you! Happy Birthday, dear %t!!!
/y Happy Birthday to you!
 
This one uses what we of the programming community refer to as a wildcard, which is the %t. Using %t means that it will take the name of your current Target, and use that in its place. So if I had my mage targeted when I clicked this macro then it would yell (the /y means to yell) “Happy Birthday to you! Happy Birthday to you! Happy Birthday, dear Psynister!!! Happy Birthday to you!” so that everyone in the area could hear it.  As I said, I do not use this one very often, and the one particular use in Dalaran had about 5 different people ready to kill me even though I only used it once. So /y is not always the best method to use, but in this case I really did not care as someone’s birthday is worthy of celebration regardless of the haters.
 
To throw one more quick example out there of a chat macro, I often times find that I need to do some spamming of chat for one reason or another. Sometimes I use it when I want to buy or sell a certain item, or sometimes I need to fill an open slot in a raid, or I want to join a raid myself. When doing this you have a few options; you can either retype what you want to say each time, you can open the chat window and then use ALT + Arrow Up/Down to scroll through what you have recently said, or you can make a macro for it. Following are some examples of this:
 
/2 LF Blacksmith 350+, pst w/ link
 
/4 DPS LFG – 10 man Vault
 
/1 Offering free runs through SM: Cath for any lv 20+, pst for invite
 
Basically anything that you want to “spam” in the chat channels can be done here, and it can be done in any of the channels that you are in. It can also be done in multiple channels if you wish by just changing the number after the ‘/’ and adding multiple lines. Generally if someone can see one of the channels you are broadcasting in, then they can see the others as well. I generally only suggest using multiple chat channels when doing a search for group with maybe a macro that targets both the LookingForGroup channel (typically /4), and the General (/1) or Trade (/2) channel as well. If you use other combinations such as both Local (/1) and Trade (/2) then you basically are spamming because everyone who can see Trade can also see General if they are in your area, so those people are seeing your message multiple times for each click, and for no reason.
 
Gathering Macros
This particular set of macros have varying uses, and their functionality can easily be replaced by addons if you wish, or you can keep some of your system resources free and just use macros instead. I am going to discuss here two particular aspects of gathering macros, one being to toggle your minimap find feature, and the other to track how many of a specific item you have for when doing things such as farming a specific material.
 
While many people suggest you never take both Mining and Herbalism on a single character, there is nothing wrong with doing so if you have the patience to hit this macro while you travel. For this macro, I would suggest you use the question mark icon to know which Find skill you will use if you activate the macro.
 
#showtooltip
/castsequence Find Minerals, Find Herbs
 
The first line in this macro changes the information that will be displayed when you move your mouse over the macro icon, and will also change the picture of the icon to match whichever Find skill will be used if you click it. If you have not activated the macro at all yet, it will show the Find Minerals (mining) icon and tell you the information for that skill if you put your mouse over it. Once you click the macro it will move on to the next skill in sequence, which happens to be Find Herbs (herbalism) and will change the tool tip information accordingly. Since there are no other spells in the sequence, the icon would then change back to Find Minerals if you were to click it again, and it will continue to cycle indefinitely for as many times as you activate it.
 
If you have other tracking abilities like the Hunter and Paladin do, you can also put those in a similar macro or even combine them into the same one. Just make sure that you always use the full name of the spell or ability that you wish to use or your macro will not work correctly. Example:
 
#showtooltip
/castsequence Find Minerals, Detect Undead, Find Herbs, Detect Undead
 
The example above with first search for mining nodes, then for undead, then for herbalism spawns, and then for undead again before looping back to mining. I rarely search for undead myself, but you can take the idea here and apply it however you wish.
 
To expand just a bit more on macros, with further details coming in a later post, you can also be more specific with a gathering macro like this for when you have multiple find options available to you.
 
#showtooltip
/cast [modifier:alt] Find Minerals; [modifier:shift] Find Herbs; Track Humanoids
 
This macro will act similar to the one above except that rather than moving through the abilities in a sequence, one after the other, this one uses the ability that you specify based on which buttons you press while activating the macro. By default (i.e. no other keys pressed) this macro will activate Track Humanoids for the hunter using it. If you hold the ALT key while you click on the macro, then it will change to Find Minerals. Likewise, if you hold the SHIFT key while clicking the macro, it will cast Find Herbs instead. There are a few differences in this macro compared to the last one that you need to take note of if you plan on using it. First, this one uses /cast instead of /castsequence. This is done because we are using the modifier keys to select specific tracking skills rather than doing them in sequential order. Second, the comas that separate skills in the /castsequence macro have been replaced with semi-colons to designate which modifiers apply to which skills.
 
Another little tidbit of information on the above macro is that by using the #showtooltip code at the top along with the question mark icon, as soon as you press one of those modifier keys (alt or shift) it will change the icon to the appropriate ability so that you know which skill you are about to activate if you click on the icon.
 
When you want to track how many of a particular material you have in your bags, you will do something like the following, again with the question mark icon:
 
#showtooltip Frostweave Cloth
 
One line of code is all you need to make that happen. When you want to track something different, just replace the “Frostweave Cloth” with any other item you want. The first thing this will do is replace the macro icon with the icon for the item you wish to track. Secondly it will place the total number you have in your bags into the corner of the icon so that you can track it similar to what you see when you have a stack of potions or other stackable items in your bags. And finally, it will use the items tool tip information when you place your mouse over the icon as it would with the item itself. You can only view a single item at a time with this macro, but you can make multiple copies of the macro if you wish to track more items.
 
 
Conclusion
Now, I know that I did not go into great detail on much of anything up there, but I wanted to give you something to chew on for now before I go into greater detail in the next article. The next one will be on casting spells themselves for both combat abilities as well as buffs. There will be a greater degree of detail in those due to the nature of those macros and the importance of you knowing what they will do when you are using them in combat.
 
If you have any specific macros that you would like to see, feel free to leave me a reply here and I will do my best to cover it in future articles. Feel free to email me any specific requests as well if you would like me to respond with a possible solution in a shorter amount of time.
 
That’s it for this break. Until next time.
 
1 Comment

Posted by on April 6, 2009 in Macro

 

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